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Zinc lozenges may shorten the duration of colds: a systematic review.
Open Respir Med J 2011; 5:51-8OR

Abstract

BACKGROUND

A number of controlled trials have examined the effect of zinc lozenges on the common cold but the findings have diverged. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the total daily dose of zinc might explain part of the variation in the results.

METHODS

The Medline, Scopus and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials data bases were searched for placebocontrolled trials examining the effect of zinc lozenges on common cold duration. Two methods were used for analysis: the P-values of the trials were combined by using the Fisher method and the results of the trials were pooled by using the inverse-variance method. Both approaches were used for all the identified trials and separately for the low zinc dose and the high zinc dose trials.

RESULTS

Thirteen placebo-controlled comparisons have examined the therapeutic effect of zinc lozenges on common cold episodes of natural origin. Five of the trials used a total daily zinc dose of less than 75 mg and uniformly found no effect. Three trials used zinc acetate in daily doses of over 75 mg, the pooled result indicating a 42% reduction in the duration of colds (95% CI: 35% to 48%). Five trials used zinc salts other than acetate in daily doses of over 75 mg, the pooled result indicating a 20% reduction in the duration of colds (95% CI: 12% to 28%).

CONCLUSIONS

This study shows strong evidence that the zinc lozenge effect on common cold duration is heterogeneous so that benefit is observed with high doses of zinc but not with low doses. The effects of zinc lozenges should be further studied to determine the optimal lozenge compositions and treatment strategies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21769305

Citation

Hemilä, Harri. "Zinc Lozenges May Shorten the Duration of Colds: a Systematic Review." The Open Respiratory Medicine Journal, vol. 5, 2011, pp. 51-8.
Hemilä H. Zinc lozenges may shorten the duration of colds: a systematic review. Open Respir Med J. 2011;5:51-8.
Hemilä, H. (2011). Zinc lozenges may shorten the duration of colds: a systematic review. The Open Respiratory Medicine Journal, 5, pp. 51-8. doi:10.2174/1874306401105010051.
Hemilä H. Zinc Lozenges May Shorten the Duration of Colds: a Systematic Review. Open Respir Med J. 2011;5:51-8. PubMed PMID: 21769305.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Zinc lozenges may shorten the duration of colds: a systematic review. A1 - Hemilä,Harri, Y1 - 2011/06/23/ PY - 2011/01/24/received PY - 2011/05/04/revised PY - 2011/05/19/accepted PY - 2011/7/20/entrez PY - 2011/7/20/pubmed PY - 2011/7/20/medline KW - Meta-analysis KW - randomized controlled trials KW - respiratory infections KW - zinc. SP - 51 EP - 8 JF - The open respiratory medicine journal JO - Open Respir Med J VL - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: A number of controlled trials have examined the effect of zinc lozenges on the common cold but the findings have diverged. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the total daily dose of zinc might explain part of the variation in the results. METHODS: The Medline, Scopus and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials data bases were searched for placebocontrolled trials examining the effect of zinc lozenges on common cold duration. Two methods were used for analysis: the P-values of the trials were combined by using the Fisher method and the results of the trials were pooled by using the inverse-variance method. Both approaches were used for all the identified trials and separately for the low zinc dose and the high zinc dose trials. RESULTS: Thirteen placebo-controlled comparisons have examined the therapeutic effect of zinc lozenges on common cold episodes of natural origin. Five of the trials used a total daily zinc dose of less than 75 mg and uniformly found no effect. Three trials used zinc acetate in daily doses of over 75 mg, the pooled result indicating a 42% reduction in the duration of colds (95% CI: 35% to 48%). Five trials used zinc salts other than acetate in daily doses of over 75 mg, the pooled result indicating a 20% reduction in the duration of colds (95% CI: 12% to 28%). CONCLUSIONS: This study shows strong evidence that the zinc lozenge effect on common cold duration is heterogeneous so that benefit is observed with high doses of zinc but not with low doses. The effects of zinc lozenges should be further studied to determine the optimal lozenge compositions and treatment strategies. SN - 1874-3064 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21769305/full_citation L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/21769305/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -