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Ginger (Zingiber officinale) reduces acute chemotherapy-induced nausea: a URCC CCOP study of 576 patients.
Support Care Cancer 2012; 20(7):1479-89SC

Abstract

PURPOSE

Despite the widespread use of antiemetics, nausea continues to be reported by over 70% of patients receiving chemotherapy.

METHODS

In this double blind, multicenter trial, we randomly assigned 744 cancer patients to four arms: 1) placebo, 2) 0.5 g ginger, 3) 1.0 g ginger, or 4) 1.5 g ginger. Nausea occurrence and severity were assessed at a baseline cycle and the two following cycles during which patients were taking their assigned study medication. All patients received a 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist antiemetic on Day 1 of all cycles. Patients took three capsules of ginger (250 mg) or placebo twice daily for 6 days starting 3 days before the first day of chemotherapy. Patients reported the severity of nausea on a 7-point rating scale ("1" = "Not at all Nauseated" and "7" = "Extremely Nauseated") for Days 1-4 of each cycle. The primary outcomes were to determine the dose and efficacy of ginger at reducing the severity of chemotherapy-induced nausea on Day 1 of chemotherapy.

RESULTS

A total of 576 patients were included in final analysis (91% female, mean age = 53). Mixed model analyses demonstrated that all doses of ginger significantly reduced acute nausea severity compared to placebo on Day 1 of chemotherapy (p = 0.003). The largest reduction in nausea intensity occurred with 0.5 g and 1.0 g of ginger (p = 0.017 and p = 0.036, respectively). Anticipatory nausea was a key factor in acute chemotherapy-induced nausea (p < 0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS

Ginger supplementation at a daily dose of 0.5 g-1.0 g significantly aids in reduction of the severity of acute chemotherapy-induced nausea in adult cancer patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departments of Dermatology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Ave, Box 697, Rochester, NY 14642, USA. julie_ryan@urmc.rochester.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial, Phase II
Clinical Trial, Phase III
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21818642

Citation

Ryan, Julie L., et al. "Ginger (Zingiber Officinale) Reduces Acute Chemotherapy-induced Nausea: a URCC CCOP Study of 576 Patients." Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer, vol. 20, no. 7, 2012, pp. 1479-89.
Ryan JL, Heckler CE, Roscoe JA, et al. Ginger (Zingiber officinale) reduces acute chemotherapy-induced nausea: a URCC CCOP study of 576 patients. Support Care Cancer. 2012;20(7):1479-89.
Ryan, J. L., Heckler, C. E., Roscoe, J. A., Dakhil, S. R., Kirshner, J., Flynn, P. J., ... Morrow, G. R. (2012). Ginger (Zingiber officinale) reduces acute chemotherapy-induced nausea: a URCC CCOP study of 576 patients. Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer, 20(7), pp. 1479-89. doi:10.1007/s00520-011-1236-3.
Ryan JL, et al. Ginger (Zingiber Officinale) Reduces Acute Chemotherapy-induced Nausea: a URCC CCOP Study of 576 Patients. Support Care Cancer. 2012;20(7):1479-89. PubMed PMID: 21818642.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ginger (Zingiber officinale) reduces acute chemotherapy-induced nausea: a URCC CCOP study of 576 patients. AU - Ryan,Julie L, AU - Heckler,Charles E, AU - Roscoe,Joseph A, AU - Dakhil,Shaker R, AU - Kirshner,Jeffrey, AU - Flynn,Patrick J, AU - Hickok,Jane T, AU - Morrow,Gary R, Y1 - 2011/08/05/ PY - 2011/03/14/received PY - 2011/07/15/accepted PY - 2011/8/6/entrez PY - 2011/8/6/pubmed PY - 2012/10/23/medline SP - 1479 EP - 89 JF - Supportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer JO - Support Care Cancer VL - 20 IS - 7 N2 - PURPOSE: Despite the widespread use of antiemetics, nausea continues to be reported by over 70% of patients receiving chemotherapy. METHODS: In this double blind, multicenter trial, we randomly assigned 744 cancer patients to four arms: 1) placebo, 2) 0.5 g ginger, 3) 1.0 g ginger, or 4) 1.5 g ginger. Nausea occurrence and severity were assessed at a baseline cycle and the two following cycles during which patients were taking their assigned study medication. All patients received a 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist antiemetic on Day 1 of all cycles. Patients took three capsules of ginger (250 mg) or placebo twice daily for 6 days starting 3 days before the first day of chemotherapy. Patients reported the severity of nausea on a 7-point rating scale ("1" = "Not at all Nauseated" and "7" = "Extremely Nauseated") for Days 1-4 of each cycle. The primary outcomes were to determine the dose and efficacy of ginger at reducing the severity of chemotherapy-induced nausea on Day 1 of chemotherapy. RESULTS: A total of 576 patients were included in final analysis (91% female, mean age = 53). Mixed model analyses demonstrated that all doses of ginger significantly reduced acute nausea severity compared to placebo on Day 1 of chemotherapy (p = 0.003). The largest reduction in nausea intensity occurred with 0.5 g and 1.0 g of ginger (p = 0.017 and p = 0.036, respectively). Anticipatory nausea was a key factor in acute chemotherapy-induced nausea (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Ginger supplementation at a daily dose of 0.5 g-1.0 g significantly aids in reduction of the severity of acute chemotherapy-induced nausea in adult cancer patients. SN - 1433-7339 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21818642/full_citation L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-011-1236-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -