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Vegetable and fruit intake after diagnosis and risk of prostate cancer progression.

Abstract

Cruciferous vegetables, tomato sauce and legumes have been associated with reduced risk of incident advanced prostate cancer. In vitro and animal studies suggest these foods may inhibit progression of prostate cancer, but there are limited data in men. Therefore, we prospectively examined whether intake of total vegetables, and specifically cruciferous vegetables, tomato sauce and legumes, after diagnosis reduce risk of prostate cancer progression among 1,560 men diagnosed with non-metastatic prostate cancer and participating in the Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urologic Research Endeavor, a United States prostate cancer registry. As a secondary analysis, we also examined other vegetable subgroups, total fruit and subgroups of fruits. The participants were diagnosed primarily at community-based clinics and followed from 2004 to 2009. We assessed vegetable and fruit intake via a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire, and ascertained prostate cancer outcomes via urologist report and medical records. We observed 134 events of progression (53 biochemical recurrences, 71 secondary treatments likely due to recurrence, 6 bone metastases and 4 prostate cancer deaths) during 3,171 person-years. Men in the fourth quartile of post-diagnostic cruciferous vegetable intake had a statistically significant 59% decreased risk of prostate cancer progression compared to men in the lowest quartile (hazard ratio (HR): 0.41; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.22, 0.76; p-trend: 0.003). No other vegetable or fruit group was statistically significantly associated with risk of prostate cancer progression. In conclusion, cruciferous vegetable intake after diagnosis may reduce risk of prostate cancer progression.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. richmane@urology.ucsf.edu

    ,

    Source

    International journal of cancer 131:1 2012 Jul 01 pg 201-10

    MeSH

    Disease Progression
    Eating
    Feeding Behavior
    Fruit
    Humans
    Male
    Prostatic Neoplasms
    Risk
    Risk Factors
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Vegetables

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    21823116

    Citation

    Richman, Erin L., et al. "Vegetable and Fruit Intake After Diagnosis and Risk of Prostate Cancer Progression." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 131, no. 1, 2012, pp. 201-10.
    Richman EL, Carroll PR, Chan JM. Vegetable and fruit intake after diagnosis and risk of prostate cancer progression. Int J Cancer. 2012;131(1):201-10.
    Richman, E. L., Carroll, P. R., & Chan, J. M. (2012). Vegetable and fruit intake after diagnosis and risk of prostate cancer progression. International Journal of Cancer, 131(1), pp. 201-10. doi:10.1002/ijc.26348.
    Richman EL, Carroll PR, Chan JM. Vegetable and Fruit Intake After Diagnosis and Risk of Prostate Cancer Progression. Int J Cancer. 2012 Jul 1;131(1):201-10. PubMed PMID: 21823116.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Vegetable and fruit intake after diagnosis and risk of prostate cancer progression. AU - Richman,Erin L, AU - Carroll,Peter R, AU - Chan,June M, Y1 - 2011/08/30/ PY - 2011/06/30/received PY - 2011/07/29/accepted PY - 2011/8/9/entrez PY - 2011/8/9/pubmed PY - 2012/6/15/medline SP - 201 EP - 10 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 131 IS - 1 N2 - Cruciferous vegetables, tomato sauce and legumes have been associated with reduced risk of incident advanced prostate cancer. In vitro and animal studies suggest these foods may inhibit progression of prostate cancer, but there are limited data in men. Therefore, we prospectively examined whether intake of total vegetables, and specifically cruciferous vegetables, tomato sauce and legumes, after diagnosis reduce risk of prostate cancer progression among 1,560 men diagnosed with non-metastatic prostate cancer and participating in the Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urologic Research Endeavor, a United States prostate cancer registry. As a secondary analysis, we also examined other vegetable subgroups, total fruit and subgroups of fruits. The participants were diagnosed primarily at community-based clinics and followed from 2004 to 2009. We assessed vegetable and fruit intake via a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire, and ascertained prostate cancer outcomes via urologist report and medical records. We observed 134 events of progression (53 biochemical recurrences, 71 secondary treatments likely due to recurrence, 6 bone metastases and 4 prostate cancer deaths) during 3,171 person-years. Men in the fourth quartile of post-diagnostic cruciferous vegetable intake had a statistically significant 59% decreased risk of prostate cancer progression compared to men in the lowest quartile (hazard ratio (HR): 0.41; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.22, 0.76; p-trend: 0.003). No other vegetable or fruit group was statistically significantly associated with risk of prostate cancer progression. In conclusion, cruciferous vegetable intake after diagnosis may reduce risk of prostate cancer progression. SN - 1097-0215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21823116/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.26348 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -