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Increasing incidence and prevalence of the inflammatory bowel diseases with time, based on systematic review.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS

We conducted a systematic review to determine changes in the worldwide incidence and prevalence of ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) in different regions and with time.

METHODS

We performed a systematic literature search of MEDLINE (1950-2010; 8103 citations) and EMBASE (1980-2010; 4975 citations) to identify studies that were population based, included data that could be used to calculate incidence and prevalence, and reported separate data on UC and/or CD in full manuscripts (n = 260). We evaluated data from 167 studies from Europe (1930-2008), 52 studies from Asia and the Middle East (1950-2008), and 27 studies from North America (1920-2004). Maps were used to present worldwide differences in the incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs); time trends were determined using joinpoint regression.

RESULTS

The highest annual incidence of UC was 24.3 per 100,000 person-years in Europe, 6.3 per 100,000 person-years in Asia and the Middle East, and 19.2 per 100,000 person-years in North America. The highest annual incidence of CD was 12.7 per 100,000 person-years in Europe, 5.0 person-years in Asia and the Middle East, and 20.2 per 100,000 person-years in North America. The highest reported prevalence values for IBD were in Europe (UC, 505 per 100,000 persons; CD, 322 per 100,000 persons) and North America (UC, 249 per 100,000 persons; CD, 319 per 100,000 persons). In time-trend analyses, 75% of CD studies and 60% of UC studies had an increasing incidence of statistical significance (P < .05).

CONCLUSIONS

Although there are few epidemiologic data from developing countries, the incidence and prevalence of IBD are increasing with time and in different regions around the world, indicating its emergence as a global disease.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

    , , , , , , , , ,

    Source

    Gastroenterology 142:1 2012 Jan pg 46-54.e42; quiz e30

    MeSH

    Asia
    Colitis, Ulcerative
    Crohn Disease
    Developing Countries
    Europe
    Global Health
    Humans
    Incidence
    Middle East
    North America
    Prevalence
    Regression Analysis
    Residence Characteristics
    Time Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Review
    Systematic Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22001864

    Citation

    Molodecky, Natalie A., et al. "Increasing Incidence and Prevalence of the Inflammatory Bowel Diseases With Time, Based On Systematic Review." Gastroenterology, vol. 142, no. 1, 2012, pp. 46-54.e42; quiz e30.
    Molodecky NA, Soon IS, Rabi DM, et al. Increasing incidence and prevalence of the inflammatory bowel diseases with time, based on systematic review. Gastroenterology. 2012;142(1):46-54.e42; quiz e30.
    Molodecky, N. A., Soon, I. S., Rabi, D. M., Ghali, W. A., Ferris, M., Chernoff, G., ... Kaplan, G. G. (2012). Increasing incidence and prevalence of the inflammatory bowel diseases with time, based on systematic review. Gastroenterology, 142(1), pp. 46-54.e42; quiz e30. doi:10.1053/j.gastro.2011.10.001.
    Molodecky NA, et al. Increasing Incidence and Prevalence of the Inflammatory Bowel Diseases With Time, Based On Systematic Review. Gastroenterology. 2012;142(1):46-54.e42; quiz e30. PubMed PMID: 22001864.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Increasing incidence and prevalence of the inflammatory bowel diseases with time, based on systematic review. AU - Molodecky,Natalie A, AU - Soon,Ing Shian, AU - Rabi,Doreen M, AU - Ghali,William A, AU - Ferris,Mollie, AU - Chernoff,Greg, AU - Benchimol,Eric I, AU - Panaccione,Remo, AU - Ghosh,Subrata, AU - Barkema,Herman W, AU - Kaplan,Gilaad G, Y1 - 2011/10/14/ PY - 2011/01/01/received PY - 2011/09/26/revised PY - 2011/10/03/accepted PY - 2011/10/18/entrez PY - 2011/10/18/pubmed PY - 2012/2/15/medline SP - 46-54.e42; quiz e30 JF - Gastroenterology JO - Gastroenterology VL - 142 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND & AIMS: We conducted a systematic review to determine changes in the worldwide incidence and prevalence of ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) in different regions and with time. METHODS: We performed a systematic literature search of MEDLINE (1950-2010; 8103 citations) and EMBASE (1980-2010; 4975 citations) to identify studies that were population based, included data that could be used to calculate incidence and prevalence, and reported separate data on UC and/or CD in full manuscripts (n = 260). We evaluated data from 167 studies from Europe (1930-2008), 52 studies from Asia and the Middle East (1950-2008), and 27 studies from North America (1920-2004). Maps were used to present worldwide differences in the incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs); time trends were determined using joinpoint regression. RESULTS: The highest annual incidence of UC was 24.3 per 100,000 person-years in Europe, 6.3 per 100,000 person-years in Asia and the Middle East, and 19.2 per 100,000 person-years in North America. The highest annual incidence of CD was 12.7 per 100,000 person-years in Europe, 5.0 person-years in Asia and the Middle East, and 20.2 per 100,000 person-years in North America. The highest reported prevalence values for IBD were in Europe (UC, 505 per 100,000 persons; CD, 322 per 100,000 persons) and North America (UC, 249 per 100,000 persons; CD, 319 per 100,000 persons). In time-trend analyses, 75% of CD studies and 60% of UC studies had an increasing incidence of statistical significance (P < .05). CONCLUSIONS: Although there are few epidemiologic data from developing countries, the incidence and prevalence of IBD are increasing with time and in different regions around the world, indicating its emergence as a global disease. SN - 1528-0012 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22001864/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0016-5085(11)01378-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -