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Effects of yoga interventions on pain and pain-associated disability: a meta-analysis.
J Pain 2012; 13(1):1-9JP

Abstract

We searched databases for controlled clinical studies, and performed a meta-analysis on the effectiveness of yoga interventions on pain and associated disability. Five randomized studies reported single-blinding and had a higher methodological quality; 7 studies were randomized but not blinded and had moderate quality; and 4 nonrandomized studies had low quality. In 6 studies, yoga was used to treat patients with back pain; in 2 studies to treat rheumatoid arthritis; in 2 studies to treat patients with headache/migraine; and 6 studies enrolled individuals for other indications. All studies reported positive effects in favor of the yoga interventions. With respect to pain, a random effect meta-analysis estimated the overall treatment effect at SMD = -.74 (CI: -.97; -.52, P < .0001), and an overall treatment effect at SMD = -.79 (CI: -1.02; -.56, P < .0001) for pain-related disability. Despite some limitations, there is evidence that yoga may be useful for several pain-associated disorders. Moreover, there are hints that even short-term interventions might be effective. Nevertheless, large-scale further studies have to identify which patients may benefit from the respective interventions.

PERSPECTIVE

This meta-analysis suggests that yoga is a useful supplementary approach with moderate effect sizes on pain and associated disability.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Integrative Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Witten/Herdecke, Herdecke, Germany. arndt.buessing@uni-wh.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22178433

Citation

Büssing, Arndt, et al. "Effects of Yoga Interventions On Pain and Pain-associated Disability: a Meta-analysis." The Journal of Pain : Official Journal of the American Pain Society, vol. 13, no. 1, 2012, pp. 1-9.
Büssing A, Ostermann T, Lüdtke R, et al. Effects of yoga interventions on pain and pain-associated disability: a meta-analysis. J Pain. 2012;13(1):1-9.
Büssing, A., Ostermann, T., Lüdtke, R., & Michalsen, A. (2012). Effects of yoga interventions on pain and pain-associated disability: a meta-analysis. The Journal of Pain : Official Journal of the American Pain Society, 13(1), pp. 1-9. doi:10.1016/j.jpain.2011.10.001.
Büssing A, et al. Effects of Yoga Interventions On Pain and Pain-associated Disability: a Meta-analysis. J Pain. 2012;13(1):1-9. PubMed PMID: 22178433.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of yoga interventions on pain and pain-associated disability: a meta-analysis. AU - Büssing,Arndt, AU - Ostermann,Thomas, AU - Lüdtke,Rainer, AU - Michalsen,Andreas, Y1 - 2011/12/16/ PY - 2011/03/18/received PY - 2011/09/28/revised PY - 2011/12/20/entrez PY - 2011/12/20/pubmed PY - 2012/4/25/medline SP - 1 EP - 9 JF - The journal of pain : official journal of the American Pain Society JO - J Pain VL - 13 IS - 1 N2 - UNLABELLED: We searched databases for controlled clinical studies, and performed a meta-analysis on the effectiveness of yoga interventions on pain and associated disability. Five randomized studies reported single-blinding and had a higher methodological quality; 7 studies were randomized but not blinded and had moderate quality; and 4 nonrandomized studies had low quality. In 6 studies, yoga was used to treat patients with back pain; in 2 studies to treat rheumatoid arthritis; in 2 studies to treat patients with headache/migraine; and 6 studies enrolled individuals for other indications. All studies reported positive effects in favor of the yoga interventions. With respect to pain, a random effect meta-analysis estimated the overall treatment effect at SMD = -.74 (CI: -.97; -.52, P < .0001), and an overall treatment effect at SMD = -.79 (CI: -1.02; -.56, P < .0001) for pain-related disability. Despite some limitations, there is evidence that yoga may be useful for several pain-associated disorders. Moreover, there are hints that even short-term interventions might be effective. Nevertheless, large-scale further studies have to identify which patients may benefit from the respective interventions. PERSPECTIVE: This meta-analysis suggests that yoga is a useful supplementary approach with moderate effect sizes on pain and associated disability. SN - 1528-8447 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22178433/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1526-5900(11)00792-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -