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Dietary fat intake and risk of ovarian cancer in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study.
Br J Cancer 2012; 106(3):596-602BJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Fat intake has been postulated to increase risk of ovarian cancer, but previous studies have reported inconsistent results.

METHODS

The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study, a large prospective cohort, assessed diet using a food frequency questionnaire at baseline in 1995-1996. During an average of 9 years of follow-up, 695 ovarian cancer cases were ascertained through the state cancer registry database. The relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated using a Cox proportional hazard model.

RESULTS

Women in the highest vs the lowest quintile of total fat intake had a 28% increased risk of ovarian cancer (RR(Q5 vs Q1)=1.28, 95% CI: 1.01-1.63). Fat intake from animal sources (RR(Q5 vs Q1)=1.30; 95% CI: 1.02-1.66), but not from plant sources, was positively associated with ovarian cancer risk. Saturated and monounsaturated fat intakes were not related to risk of ovarian cancer, but polyunsaturated fat intake showed a weak positive association. The association between total fat intake and ovarian cancer was stronger in women who were nulliparous or never used oral contraceptives.

CONCLUSION

Fat intake, especially from animal sources, was related to an increased risk of ovarian cancer. The association may be modified by parity and oral contraceptive use, which warrants further investigation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD 20852, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22223086

Citation

Blank, M M., et al. "Dietary Fat Intake and Risk of Ovarian Cancer in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study." British Journal of Cancer, vol. 106, no. 3, 2012, pp. 596-602.
Blank MM, Wentzensen N, Murphy MA, et al. Dietary fat intake and risk of ovarian cancer in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Br J Cancer. 2012;106(3):596-602.
Blank, M. M., Wentzensen, N., Murphy, M. A., Hollenbeck, A., & Park, Y. (2012). Dietary fat intake and risk of ovarian cancer in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. British Journal of Cancer, 106(3), pp. 596-602. doi:10.1038/bjc.2011.572.
Blank MM, et al. Dietary Fat Intake and Risk of Ovarian Cancer in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Br J Cancer. 2012 Jan 31;106(3):596-602. PubMed PMID: 22223086.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary fat intake and risk of ovarian cancer in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. AU - Blank,M M, AU - Wentzensen,N, AU - Murphy,M A, AU - Hollenbeck,A, AU - Park,Y, Y1 - 2012/01/05/ PY - 2012/1/7/entrez PY - 2012/1/10/pubmed PY - 2012/3/28/medline SP - 596 EP - 602 JF - British journal of cancer JO - Br. J. Cancer VL - 106 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Fat intake has been postulated to increase risk of ovarian cancer, but previous studies have reported inconsistent results. METHODS: The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study, a large prospective cohort, assessed diet using a food frequency questionnaire at baseline in 1995-1996. During an average of 9 years of follow-up, 695 ovarian cancer cases were ascertained through the state cancer registry database. The relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated using a Cox proportional hazard model. RESULTS: Women in the highest vs the lowest quintile of total fat intake had a 28% increased risk of ovarian cancer (RR(Q5 vs Q1)=1.28, 95% CI: 1.01-1.63). Fat intake from animal sources (RR(Q5 vs Q1)=1.30; 95% CI: 1.02-1.66), but not from plant sources, was positively associated with ovarian cancer risk. Saturated and monounsaturated fat intakes were not related to risk of ovarian cancer, but polyunsaturated fat intake showed a weak positive association. The association between total fat intake and ovarian cancer was stronger in women who were nulliparous or never used oral contraceptives. CONCLUSION: Fat intake, especially from animal sources, was related to an increased risk of ovarian cancer. The association may be modified by parity and oral contraceptive use, which warrants further investigation. SN - 1532-1827 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22223086/full_citation L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/bjc.2011.572 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -