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Will the real vegetarian please stand up? An investigation of dietary restraint and eating disorder symptoms in vegetarians versus non-vegetarians.
Appetite 2012; 58(3):982-90A

Abstract

Adherence to a vegetarian diet has been hypothesized to be a factor in the onset and maintenance of disordered eating behavior; however, evidence to support this assumption has been largely mixed. The two studies presented here sought to address the causes of inconsistent findings in previous research, including: small samples of true vegetarians, lack of appropriate operational definitions of "vegetarianism", and uncertainty about the appropriateness of existing assessments of eating behaviors for semi-vegetarians. Study 1 assessed eating behaviors in the largest samples of confirmed true vegetarians and vegans surveyed to date, and compared them to semi-vegetarians and omnivores. Semi-vegetarians reported the highest levels of eating-related pathology; true vegetarians and vegans appeared to be healthiest in regards to weight and eating. Study 2 examined differences between semi-vegetarians and omnivores in terms of restraint and disordered eating and found little evidence for more eating-related pathology in semi-vegetarians, compared to omnivores. Semi-vegetarians' higher scores on traditional assessments of eating behaviors appeared artificially inflated by ratings of items assessing avoidance of specific food items which should be considered normative in the context of a vegetarian diet. Findings shed light on the sources of inconsistencies in prior research on eating behaviors in vegetarians and suggest that semi-vegetarianism - as opposed to true vegetarianism or veganism - is the most likely related to disordered eating.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Towson University, Towson, MD 21252, USA. a.timko@usp.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22343135

Citation

Timko, C Alix, et al. "Will the Real Vegetarian Please Stand Up? an Investigation of Dietary Restraint and Eating Disorder Symptoms in Vegetarians Versus Non-vegetarians." Appetite, vol. 58, no. 3, 2012, pp. 982-90.
Timko CA, Hormes JM, Chubski J. Will the real vegetarian please stand up? An investigation of dietary restraint and eating disorder symptoms in vegetarians versus non-vegetarians. Appetite. 2012;58(3):982-90.
Timko, C. A., Hormes, J. M., & Chubski, J. (2012). Will the real vegetarian please stand up? An investigation of dietary restraint and eating disorder symptoms in vegetarians versus non-vegetarians. Appetite, 58(3), pp. 982-90. doi:10.1016/j.appet.2012.02.005.
Timko CA, Hormes JM, Chubski J. Will the Real Vegetarian Please Stand Up? an Investigation of Dietary Restraint and Eating Disorder Symptoms in Vegetarians Versus Non-vegetarians. Appetite. 2012;58(3):982-90. PubMed PMID: 22343135.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Will the real vegetarian please stand up? An investigation of dietary restraint and eating disorder symptoms in vegetarians versus non-vegetarians. AU - Timko,C Alix, AU - Hormes,Julia M, AU - Chubski,Janice, Y1 - 2012/02/14/ PY - 2011/03/04/received PY - 2012/02/05/revised PY - 2012/02/07/accepted PY - 2012/2/21/entrez PY - 2012/2/22/pubmed PY - 2012/9/20/medline SP - 982 EP - 90 JF - Appetite JO - Appetite VL - 58 IS - 3 N2 - Adherence to a vegetarian diet has been hypothesized to be a factor in the onset and maintenance of disordered eating behavior; however, evidence to support this assumption has been largely mixed. The two studies presented here sought to address the causes of inconsistent findings in previous research, including: small samples of true vegetarians, lack of appropriate operational definitions of "vegetarianism", and uncertainty about the appropriateness of existing assessments of eating behaviors for semi-vegetarians. Study 1 assessed eating behaviors in the largest samples of confirmed true vegetarians and vegans surveyed to date, and compared them to semi-vegetarians and omnivores. Semi-vegetarians reported the highest levels of eating-related pathology; true vegetarians and vegans appeared to be healthiest in regards to weight and eating. Study 2 examined differences between semi-vegetarians and omnivores in terms of restraint and disordered eating and found little evidence for more eating-related pathology in semi-vegetarians, compared to omnivores. Semi-vegetarians' higher scores on traditional assessments of eating behaviors appeared artificially inflated by ratings of items assessing avoidance of specific food items which should be considered normative in the context of a vegetarian diet. Findings shed light on the sources of inconsistencies in prior research on eating behaviors in vegetarians and suggest that semi-vegetarianism - as opposed to true vegetarianism or veganism - is the most likely related to disordered eating. SN - 1095-8304 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22343135/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0195-6663(12)00037-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -