Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Low fatness, reduced fat intake and adequate plasmatic concentrations of LDL-cholesterol are associated with high bone mineral density in women: a cross-sectional study with control group.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Several parameters are associated with high bone mineral density (BMD), such as overweight, black background, intense physical activity (PA), greater calcium intake and some medications. The objectives are to evaluate the prevalence and the main aspects associated with high BMD in healthy women.

METHODS

After reviewing the database of approximately 21,500 BMD scans performed in the metropolitan area of São Paulo, Brazil, from June 2005 to October 2010, high BMD (over 1400 g/cm² at lumbar spine and/or above 1200 g/cm² at femoral neck) was found in 421 exams. Exclusion criteria were age below 30 or above 60 years, black ethnicity, pregnant or obese women, disease and/or medications known to interfere with bone metabolism. A total of 40 women with high BMD were included and matched with 40 healthy women with normal BMD, paired to weight, age, skin color and menopausal status. Medical history, food intake and PA were assessed through validated questionnaires. Body composition was evaluated through a GE-Lunar DPX MD + bone densitometer. Radiography of the thoracic and lumbar spine was carried out to exclude degenerative alterations or fractures. Biochemical parameters included both lipid and hormonal profiles, along with mineral and bone metabolism. Statistical analysis included parametric and nonparametric tests and linear regression models. P < 0.05 was considered significant.

RESULTS

The mean age was 50.9 (8.3) years. There was no significant difference between groups in relation to PA, smoking, intake of calcium and vitamin D, as well as laboratory tests, except serum C-telopeptide of type I collagen (s-CTX), which was lower in the high BMD group (p = 0.04). In the final model of multivariate regression, a lower fat intake and body fatness as well a better profile of LDL-cholesterol predicted almost 35% of high BMD in women. (adjusted R2 = 0.347; p < 0.001). In addition, greater amounts of lean mass and higher IGF-1 serum concentrations played a protective role, regardless age and weight.

CONCLUSION

Our results demonstrate the potential deleterious effect of lipid metabolism-related components, including fat intake and body fatness and worse lipid profile, on bone mass and metabolism in healthy women.

Links

  • PMC Free PDF
  • PMC Free Full Text
  • FREE Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Nutrition Department, School of Public Health, Sao Paulo University, Av. Dr. Arnaldo, 715, São Paulo-SP, Brazil CEP-01246-904.

    , ,

    Source

    Lipids in health and disease 11: 2012 Mar 12 pg 37

    MeSH

    Adiposity
    Adult
    Body Mass Index
    Bone Density
    Case-Control Studies
    Cholesterol, LDL
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Diet, Fat-Restricted
    Female
    Femur Neck
    Humans
    Linear Models
    Middle Aged
    Multivariate Analysis
    Risk Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22409945

    Citation

    Sarkis, Karin S., et al. "Low Fatness, Reduced Fat Intake and Adequate Plasmatic Concentrations of LDL-cholesterol Are Associated With High Bone Mineral Density in Women: a Cross-sectional Study With Control Group." Lipids in Health and Disease, vol. 11, 2012, p. 37.
    Sarkis KS, Martini LA, Szejnfeld VL, et al. Low fatness, reduced fat intake and adequate plasmatic concentrations of LDL-cholesterol are associated with high bone mineral density in women: a cross-sectional study with control group. Lipids Health Dis. 2012;11:37.
    Sarkis, K. S., Martini, L. A., Szejnfeld, V. L., & Pinheiro, M. M. (2012). Low fatness, reduced fat intake and adequate plasmatic concentrations of LDL-cholesterol are associated with high bone mineral density in women: a cross-sectional study with control group. Lipids in Health and Disease, 11, p. 37. doi:10.1186/1476-511X-11-37.
    Sarkis KS, et al. Low Fatness, Reduced Fat Intake and Adequate Plasmatic Concentrations of LDL-cholesterol Are Associated With High Bone Mineral Density in Women: a Cross-sectional Study With Control Group. Lipids Health Dis. 2012 Mar 12;11:37. PubMed PMID: 22409945.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Low fatness, reduced fat intake and adequate plasmatic concentrations of LDL-cholesterol are associated with high bone mineral density in women: a cross-sectional study with control group. AU - Sarkis,Karin S, AU - Martini,Lígia A, AU - Szejnfeld,Vera L, AU - Pinheiro,Marcelo M, Y1 - 2012/03/12/ PY - 2011/12/27/received PY - 2012/03/12/accepted PY - 2012/3/14/entrez PY - 2012/3/14/pubmed PY - 2012/7/18/medline SP - 37 EP - 37 JF - Lipids in health and disease JO - Lipids Health Dis VL - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Several parameters are associated with high bone mineral density (BMD), such as overweight, black background, intense physical activity (PA), greater calcium intake and some medications. The objectives are to evaluate the prevalence and the main aspects associated with high BMD in healthy women. METHODS: After reviewing the database of approximately 21,500 BMD scans performed in the metropolitan area of São Paulo, Brazil, from June 2005 to October 2010, high BMD (over 1400 g/cm² at lumbar spine and/or above 1200 g/cm² at femoral neck) was found in 421 exams. Exclusion criteria were age below 30 or above 60 years, black ethnicity, pregnant or obese women, disease and/or medications known to interfere with bone metabolism. A total of 40 women with high BMD were included and matched with 40 healthy women with normal BMD, paired to weight, age, skin color and menopausal status. Medical history, food intake and PA were assessed through validated questionnaires. Body composition was evaluated through a GE-Lunar DPX MD + bone densitometer. Radiography of the thoracic and lumbar spine was carried out to exclude degenerative alterations or fractures. Biochemical parameters included both lipid and hormonal profiles, along with mineral and bone metabolism. Statistical analysis included parametric and nonparametric tests and linear regression models. P < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: The mean age was 50.9 (8.3) years. There was no significant difference between groups in relation to PA, smoking, intake of calcium and vitamin D, as well as laboratory tests, except serum C-telopeptide of type I collagen (s-CTX), which was lower in the high BMD group (p = 0.04). In the final model of multivariate regression, a lower fat intake and body fatness as well a better profile of LDL-cholesterol predicted almost 35% of high BMD in women. (adjusted R2 = 0.347; p < 0.001). In addition, greater amounts of lean mass and higher IGF-1 serum concentrations played a protective role, regardless age and weight. CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrate the potential deleterious effect of lipid metabolism-related components, including fat intake and body fatness and worse lipid profile, on bone mass and metabolism in healthy women. SN - 1476-511X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22409945/full_citation L2 - https://lipidworld.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1476-511X-11-37 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -