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Habitual intake of dietary flavonoids and risk of Parkinson disease.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To prospectively examine whether higher intakes of total flavonoids and their subclasses (flavanones, anthocyanins, flavan-3-ols, flavonols, flavones, and polymers) were associated with a lower risk of developing Parkinson disease (PD).

METHODS

In the current analysis, we included 49,281 men in the Health Professional Follow-up Study and 80,336 women from the Nurses' Health Study. Five major sources of flavonoid-rich foods (tea, berry fruits, apples, red wine, and orange/orange juice) were also examined. Flavonoid intake was assessed using an updated food composition database and a validated food frequency questionnaire.

RESULTS

We identified 805 participants (438 men and 367 women) who developed PD during 20-22 years of follow-up. In men, after adjusting for multiple confounders, participants in the highest quintile of total flavonoids had a 40%lower PD risk than those in the lowest quintile (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.60; 95% confidence interval 0.43, 0.83; p trend = 0.001). No significant relationship was observed in women (p trend = 0.62) or in pooled analyses (p trend = 0.23). In the pooled analyses for the subclasses, intakes of anthocyanins and a rich dietary source, berries, were significantly associated with a lower PD risk (HR comparing 2 extreme intake quintiles were 0.76 for anthocyanins and 0.77 for berries, respectively; p trend < 0.02 for both).

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings suggest that intake of some flavonoids may reduce PD risk, particularly in men, but a protective effect of other constituents of plant foods cannot be excluded.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Harvard Medical School,Boston, MA, USA. xiang.gao@channing.harvard.edu

    , , ,

    Source

    Neurology 78:15 2012 Apr 10 pg 1138-45

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Anthocyanins
    Beverages
    Citrus sinensis
    Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
    Feeding Behavior
    Female
    Flavanones
    Flavones
    Flavonoids
    Flavonols
    Follow-Up Studies
    Fruit
    Health Personnel
    Humans
    Incidence
    Male
    Malus
    Middle Aged
    Odds Ratio
    Parkinson Disease
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Assessment
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Tea
    Wine

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22491871

    Citation

    TY - JOUR T1 - Habitual intake of dietary flavonoids and risk of Parkinson disease. AU - Gao,X, AU - Cassidy,A, AU - Schwarzschild,M A, AU - Rimm,E B, AU - Ascherio,A, Y1 - 2012/04/04/ PY - 2012/4/12/entrez PY - 2012/4/12/pubmed PY - 2012/6/2/medline SP - 1138 EP - 45 JF - Neurology JO - Neurology VL - 78 IS - 15 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To prospectively examine whether higher intakes of total flavonoids and their subclasses (flavanones, anthocyanins, flavan-3-ols, flavonols, flavones, and polymers) were associated with a lower risk of developing Parkinson disease (PD). METHODS: In the current analysis, we included 49,281 men in the Health Professional Follow-up Study and 80,336 women from the Nurses' Health Study. Five major sources of flavonoid-rich foods (tea, berry fruits, apples, red wine, and orange/orange juice) were also examined. Flavonoid intake was assessed using an updated food composition database and a validated food frequency questionnaire. RESULTS: We identified 805 participants (438 men and 367 women) who developed PD during 20-22 years of follow-up. In men, after adjusting for multiple confounders, participants in the highest quintile of total flavonoids had a 40%lower PD risk than those in the lowest quintile (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.60; 95% confidence interval 0.43, 0.83; p trend = 0.001). No significant relationship was observed in women (p trend = 0.62) or in pooled analyses (p trend = 0.23). In the pooled analyses for the subclasses, intakes of anthocyanins and a rich dietary source, berries, were significantly associated with a lower PD risk (HR comparing 2 extreme intake quintiles were 0.76 for anthocyanins and 0.77 for berries, respectively; p trend < 0.02 for both). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that intake of some flavonoids may reduce PD risk, particularly in men, but a protective effect of other constituents of plant foods cannot be excluded. SN - 1526-632X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22491871/full_citation L2 - http://www.neurology.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=22491871 ER -