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Epidemiology of pancreatic cancer and the role of family history.
J Surg Oncol 2013; 107(1):1-7JS

Abstract

Pancreatic cancer is a lethal disease for which only a small number of risk factors have been identified. In addition to older age, male gender, and black race, risk factors include smoking, obesity, long-standing diabetes and pancreatitis, and heavy alcohol use; allergies such as hay fever are related to lowered risk. Several genetic syndromes increase risk of pancreatic cancer. Work on more common genetic variants promises to reveal more potentially important genetic associations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. olsons@mskcc.orgNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22589078

Citation

Olson, Sara H., and Robert C. Kurtz. "Epidemiology of Pancreatic Cancer and the Role of Family History." Journal of Surgical Oncology, vol. 107, no. 1, 2013, pp. 1-7.
Olson SH, Kurtz RC. Epidemiology of pancreatic cancer and the role of family history. J Surg Oncol. 2013;107(1):1-7.
Olson, S. H., & Kurtz, R. C. (2013). Epidemiology of pancreatic cancer and the role of family history. Journal of Surgical Oncology, 107(1), pp. 1-7. doi:10.1002/jso.23149.
Olson SH, Kurtz RC. Epidemiology of Pancreatic Cancer and the Role of Family History. J Surg Oncol. 2013;107(1):1-7. PubMed PMID: 22589078.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Epidemiology of pancreatic cancer and the role of family history. AU - Olson,Sara H, AU - Kurtz,Robert C, Y1 - 2012/05/15/ PY - 2012/04/10/received PY - 2012/04/17/accepted PY - 2012/5/17/entrez PY - 2012/5/17/pubmed PY - 2013/2/5/medline SP - 1 EP - 7 JF - Journal of surgical oncology JO - J Surg Oncol VL - 107 IS - 1 N2 - Pancreatic cancer is a lethal disease for which only a small number of risk factors have been identified. In addition to older age, male gender, and black race, risk factors include smoking, obesity, long-standing diabetes and pancreatitis, and heavy alcohol use; allergies such as hay fever are related to lowered risk. Several genetic syndromes increase risk of pancreatic cancer. Work on more common genetic variants promises to reveal more potentially important genetic associations. SN - 1096-9098 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22589078/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/jso.23149 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -