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Filling America's fiber intake gap: summary of a roundtable to probe realistic solutions with a focus on grain-based foods.
J Nutr 2012; 142(7):1390S-401SJN

Abstract

Current fiber intakes are alarmingly low, with long-term implications for public health related to risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, hypertension, certain gastrointestinal disorders, obesity, and the continuum of metabolic dysfunctions including prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. Eating patterns high in certain fibers are known to lower LDL cholesterol and blood pressure, lower blood glucose, and decrease insulin resistance in people with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes; help with both weight loss and maintenance; and improve bowel regularity and gastrointestinal health. With >90% of adults and children who fall short of meeting their daily fiber recommendations, the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans once again classified fiber as a nutrient of concern. Despite efforts over the past decade to promote adequate fiber through fruit, vegetable, and whole-grain intakes, fiber consumption has remained flat at approximately half the daily recommended amount. The public health implications of inadequate fiber intake prompted the roundtable session "Filling America's Fiber Gap: Probing Realistic Solutions," which assembled nutrition researchers, educators, and communicators to identify challenges, opportunities, and realistic solutions to help fill the current fiber gap. The roundtable discussions highlighted the need for both consumer and professional education to improve acceptance for and inclusion of grain-based foods with added fiber as one strategy for increasing fiber intakes within daily energy goals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. clemens@usc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22649260

Citation

Clemens, Roger, et al. "Filling America's Fiber Intake Gap: Summary of a Roundtable to Probe Realistic Solutions With a Focus On Grain-based Foods." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 142, no. 7, 2012, 1390S-401S.
Clemens R, Kranz S, Mobley AR, et al. Filling America's fiber intake gap: summary of a roundtable to probe realistic solutions with a focus on grain-based foods. J Nutr. 2012;142(7):1390S-401S.
Clemens, R., Kranz, S., Mobley, A. R., Nicklas, T. A., Raimondi, M. P., Rodriguez, J. C., ... Warshaw, H. (2012). Filling America's fiber intake gap: summary of a roundtable to probe realistic solutions with a focus on grain-based foods. The Journal of Nutrition, 142(7), 1390S-401S. doi:10.3945/jn.112.160176.
Clemens R, et al. Filling America's Fiber Intake Gap: Summary of a Roundtable to Probe Realistic Solutions With a Focus On Grain-based Foods. J Nutr. 2012;142(7):1390S-401S. PubMed PMID: 22649260.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Filling America's fiber intake gap: summary of a roundtable to probe realistic solutions with a focus on grain-based foods. AU - Clemens,Roger, AU - Kranz,Sibylle, AU - Mobley,Amy R, AU - Nicklas,Theresa A, AU - Raimondi,Mary Pat, AU - Rodriguez,Judith C, AU - Slavin,Joanne L, AU - Warshaw,Hope, Y1 - 2012/05/30/ PY - 2012/6/1/entrez PY - 2012/6/1/pubmed PY - 2012/8/31/medline SP - 1390S EP - 401S JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 142 IS - 7 N2 - Current fiber intakes are alarmingly low, with long-term implications for public health related to risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, hypertension, certain gastrointestinal disorders, obesity, and the continuum of metabolic dysfunctions including prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. Eating patterns high in certain fibers are known to lower LDL cholesterol and blood pressure, lower blood glucose, and decrease insulin resistance in people with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes; help with both weight loss and maintenance; and improve bowel regularity and gastrointestinal health. With >90% of adults and children who fall short of meeting their daily fiber recommendations, the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans once again classified fiber as a nutrient of concern. Despite efforts over the past decade to promote adequate fiber through fruit, vegetable, and whole-grain intakes, fiber consumption has remained flat at approximately half the daily recommended amount. The public health implications of inadequate fiber intake prompted the roundtable session "Filling America's Fiber Gap: Probing Realistic Solutions," which assembled nutrition researchers, educators, and communicators to identify challenges, opportunities, and realistic solutions to help fill the current fiber gap. The roundtable discussions highlighted the need for both consumer and professional education to improve acceptance for and inclusion of grain-based foods with added fiber as one strategy for increasing fiber intakes within daily energy goals. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22649260/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.112.160176 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -