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Caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and tea intakes and risk of colorectal cancer in a large prospective study.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Coffee and tea are widely consumed globally and are rich sources of potential chemopreventive compounds. Epidemiologic data for coffee and tea intakes in relation to colorectal cancer remain unclear. Despite differences in gut physiology, few studies have conducted investigations by anatomic subsites.

OBJECTIVE

We evaluated coffee and tea intakes (caffeinated and decaffeinated) in relation to colon (proximal and distal) and rectal cancers.

DESIGN

The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study included 489,706 men and women who completed a baseline (1995-1996) self-administered questionnaire of demographics, diet, and lifestyle. Over a median of 10.5 y of follow-up, we identified 2863 proximal colon, 1993 distal colon, and 1874 rectal cancers. Multivariable HRs and 95% CIs were estimated by using Cox regression.

RESULTS

Approximately 16% of participants drank ≥4 cups coffee/d. Compared with nondrinkers, drinkers of 4-5 cups coffee/d (HR: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.75, 0.96) and ≥6 cups coffee/d (HR: 0.74; 95% CI: 0.61, 0.89; P-trend < 0.001) had a lower risk of colon cancer, particularly of proximal tumors (HR for ≥6 cups/d: 0.62; 95% CI: 0.49, 0.81; P-trend < 0.0001). Results were similar to those overall for drinkers of predominantly caffeinated coffee. Although individual HRs were not significant, there was a significant P-trend for both colon and rectal cancers for people who drank predominantly decaffeinated coffee. No associations were observed for tea.

CONCLUSIONS

In this large US cohort, coffee was inversely associated with colon cancer, particularly proximal tumors. Additional investigations of coffee intake and its components in the prevention of colorectal cancer by subsites are warranted. The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00340015.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, MD, USA. sinhar@nih.gov

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    Source

    MeSH

    Beverages
    Caffeine
    Coffee
    Colorectal Neoplasms
    Diet
    Feeding Behavior
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Humans
    Life Style
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Multivariate Analysis
    Proportional Hazards Models
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Assessment
    Risk Factors
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Tea

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22695871

    Citation

    Sinha, Rashmi, et al. "Caffeinated and Decaffeinated Coffee and Tea Intakes and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in a Large Prospective Study." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 96, no. 2, 2012, pp. 374-81.
    Sinha R, Cross AJ, Daniel CR, et al. Caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and tea intakes and risk of colorectal cancer in a large prospective study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2012;96(2):374-81.
    Sinha, R., Cross, A. J., Daniel, C. R., Graubard, B. I., Wu, J. W., Hollenbeck, A. R., ... Freedman, N. D. (2012). Caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and tea intakes and risk of colorectal cancer in a large prospective study. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 96(2), pp. 374-81. doi:10.3945/ajcn.111.031328.
    Sinha R, et al. Caffeinated and Decaffeinated Coffee and Tea Intakes and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in a Large Prospective Study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2012;96(2):374-81. PubMed PMID: 22695871.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and tea intakes and risk of colorectal cancer in a large prospective study. AU - Sinha,Rashmi, AU - Cross,Amanda J, AU - Daniel,Carrie R, AU - Graubard,Barry I, AU - Wu,Jennifer W, AU - Hollenbeck,Albert R, AU - Gunter,Marc J, AU - Park,Yikyung, AU - Freedman,Neal D, Y1 - 2012/06/13/ PY - 2012/6/15/entrez PY - 2012/6/15/pubmed PY - 2012/10/2/medline SP - 374 EP - 81 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 96 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Coffee and tea are widely consumed globally and are rich sources of potential chemopreventive compounds. Epidemiologic data for coffee and tea intakes in relation to colorectal cancer remain unclear. Despite differences in gut physiology, few studies have conducted investigations by anatomic subsites. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated coffee and tea intakes (caffeinated and decaffeinated) in relation to colon (proximal and distal) and rectal cancers. DESIGN: The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study included 489,706 men and women who completed a baseline (1995-1996) self-administered questionnaire of demographics, diet, and lifestyle. Over a median of 10.5 y of follow-up, we identified 2863 proximal colon, 1993 distal colon, and 1874 rectal cancers. Multivariable HRs and 95% CIs were estimated by using Cox regression. RESULTS: Approximately 16% of participants drank ≥4 cups coffee/d. Compared with nondrinkers, drinkers of 4-5 cups coffee/d (HR: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.75, 0.96) and ≥6 cups coffee/d (HR: 0.74; 95% CI: 0.61, 0.89; P-trend < 0.001) had a lower risk of colon cancer, particularly of proximal tumors (HR for ≥6 cups/d: 0.62; 95% CI: 0.49, 0.81; P-trend < 0.0001). Results were similar to those overall for drinkers of predominantly caffeinated coffee. Although individual HRs were not significant, there was a significant P-trend for both colon and rectal cancers for people who drank predominantly decaffeinated coffee. No associations were observed for tea. CONCLUSIONS: In this large US cohort, coffee was inversely associated with colon cancer, particularly proximal tumors. Additional investigations of coffee intake and its components in the prevention of colorectal cancer by subsites are warranted. The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00340015. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22695871/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.111.031328 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -