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Peanut and tree nut consumption during pregnancy and allergic disease in children-should mothers decrease their intake? Longitudinal evidence from the Danish National Birth Cohort.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012; 130(3):724-32JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The relation between maternal peanut intake during pregnancy and allergic disease development in children has been controversial.

OBJECTIVE

We used data from the Danish National Birth Cohort to examine associations between maternal peanut and tree nut intake during pregnancy and allergic outcomes in children at 18 months and 7 years of age.

METHODS

We estimated maternal peanut and tree nut intake (n = 61,908) using a validated midpregnancy food frequency questionnaire. At 18 months, we used parental report of childhood asthma diagnosis, wheeze symptoms, and recurrent wheeze (>3 episodes). We defined current asthma at 7 years as doctor-diagnosed asthma plus wheeze in the past 12 months and allergic rhinitis as a self-reported doctor's diagnosis. We also used alternative classifications based on registry-based International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, codes and drug dispensary data. We report here odds ratios (ORs) comparing intake of 1 or more times per week versus no intake.

RESULTS

We found that maternal intake of peanuts (OR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.65-0.97) and tree nuts (OR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.67-0.84) was inversely associated with asthma in children at 18 months of age. Compared with mothers consuming no peanuts, children whose mothers reported eating peanuts 1 or more times per week were 0.66 (95% CI, 0.44-0.98) and 0.83 (95% CI, 0.70-1.00) times as likely to have a registry-based and medication-related asthma diagnosis, respectively. Higher tree nut intake was inversely associated with a medication-related asthma diagnosis (OR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.73-0.90) and self-reported allergic rhinitis (OR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.64-1.01).

CONCLUSIONS

Our results do not suggest that women should decrease peanut and tree nut intake during pregnancy; instead, consumption of peanuts and tree nuts during pregnancy might even decrease the risk of allergic disease development in children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. emaslova@post.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22743306

Citation

Maslova, Ekaterina, et al. "Peanut and Tree Nut Consumption During Pregnancy and Allergic Disease in Children-should Mothers Decrease Their Intake? Longitudinal Evidence From the Danish National Birth Cohort." The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 130, no. 3, 2012, pp. 724-32.
Maslova E, Granström C, Hansen S, et al. Peanut and tree nut consumption during pregnancy and allergic disease in children-should mothers decrease their intake? Longitudinal evidence from the Danish National Birth Cohort. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2012;130(3):724-32.
Maslova, E., Granström, C., Hansen, S., Petersen, S. B., Strøm, M., Willett, W. C., & Olsen, S. F. (2012). Peanut and tree nut consumption during pregnancy and allergic disease in children-should mothers decrease their intake? Longitudinal evidence from the Danish National Birth Cohort. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 130(3), pp. 724-32. doi:10.1016/j.jaci.2012.05.014.
Maslova E, et al. Peanut and Tree Nut Consumption During Pregnancy and Allergic Disease in Children-should Mothers Decrease Their Intake? Longitudinal Evidence From the Danish National Birth Cohort. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2012;130(3):724-32. PubMed PMID: 22743306.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Peanut and tree nut consumption during pregnancy and allergic disease in children-should mothers decrease their intake? Longitudinal evidence from the Danish National Birth Cohort. AU - Maslova,Ekaterina, AU - Granström,Charlotta, AU - Hansen,Susanne, AU - Petersen,Sesilje B, AU - Strøm,Marin, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Olsen,Sjurdur F, Y1 - 2012/06/27/ PY - 2011/11/25/received PY - 2012/04/11/revised PY - 2012/05/08/accepted PY - 2012/6/30/entrez PY - 2012/6/30/pubmed PY - 2012/11/8/medline SP - 724 EP - 32 JF - The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology JO - J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. VL - 130 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: The relation between maternal peanut intake during pregnancy and allergic disease development in children has been controversial. OBJECTIVE: We used data from the Danish National Birth Cohort to examine associations between maternal peanut and tree nut intake during pregnancy and allergic outcomes in children at 18 months and 7 years of age. METHODS: We estimated maternal peanut and tree nut intake (n = 61,908) using a validated midpregnancy food frequency questionnaire. At 18 months, we used parental report of childhood asthma diagnosis, wheeze symptoms, and recurrent wheeze (>3 episodes). We defined current asthma at 7 years as doctor-diagnosed asthma plus wheeze in the past 12 months and allergic rhinitis as a self-reported doctor's diagnosis. We also used alternative classifications based on registry-based International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, codes and drug dispensary data. We report here odds ratios (ORs) comparing intake of 1 or more times per week versus no intake. RESULTS: We found that maternal intake of peanuts (OR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.65-0.97) and tree nuts (OR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.67-0.84) was inversely associated with asthma in children at 18 months of age. Compared with mothers consuming no peanuts, children whose mothers reported eating peanuts 1 or more times per week were 0.66 (95% CI, 0.44-0.98) and 0.83 (95% CI, 0.70-1.00) times as likely to have a registry-based and medication-related asthma diagnosis, respectively. Higher tree nut intake was inversely associated with a medication-related asthma diagnosis (OR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.73-0.90) and self-reported allergic rhinitis (OR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.64-1.01). CONCLUSIONS: Our results do not suggest that women should decrease peanut and tree nut intake during pregnancy; instead, consumption of peanuts and tree nuts during pregnancy might even decrease the risk of allergic disease development in children. SN - 1097-6825 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22743306/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-6749(12)00794-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -