Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

No improvement in suboptimal vitamin A status with a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of vitamin A supplementation in children with sickle cell disease.
Am J Clin Nutr 2012; 96(4):932-40AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Suboptimal vitamin A status is prevalent in children with type SS sickle cell disease (SCD-SS) and is associated with hospitalizations and poor growth and hematologic status. The supplemental vitamin A dose that optimizes suboptimal vitamin A status in this population is unknown.

OBJECTIVE

The efficacy of Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) doses (based on age and sex) of vitamin A (300, 400, or 600 μg retinyl palmitate/d) or vitamin A + zinc (10 or 20 mg zinc sulfate/d) compared with placebo to optimize vitamin A status was assessed in children aged 2.0-12.9 y with SCD-SS and a suboptimal baseline serum retinol concentration (<30 μg/dL).

DESIGN

In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, vitamin A status (serum retinol, prealbumin, retinol-binding protein, and relative-dose-response test) and disease-related illness events were assessed.

RESULTS

Twelve months of vitamin A supplementation at the doses recommended for healthy US children (based on age and sex) failed to improve serum retinol values in either group (vitamin A: n = 23; vitamin A + zinc: n = 18) compared with placebo (n = 21). By 12 mo, the increase (±SD) in serum retinol (3.6 ± 2.8 μg/dL) in those taking 600 μg vitamin A/d was significantly different from the decrease (±SD; -2.8 ± 2.4 μg/dL) in those taking 300 μg/d, which possibly suggests a dose-response relation (P < 0.05) with RDA doses.

CONCLUSIONS

Compared with placebo, 12 mo of vitamin A supplementation at the RDA for healthy children did not improve serum retinol values in children with SCD-SS, which possibly suggests that higher doses are needed. However, the existence of alternative conclusions emphasizes the need for future research.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Divisions of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and Hematology, Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. doughertyk@email.chop.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22952182

Citation

Dougherty, Kelly A., et al. "No Improvement in Suboptimal Vitamin a Status With a Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial of Vitamin a Supplementation in Children With Sickle Cell Disease." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 96, no. 4, 2012, pp. 932-40.
Dougherty KA, Schall JI, Kawchak DA, et al. No improvement in suboptimal vitamin A status with a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of vitamin A supplementation in children with sickle cell disease. Am J Clin Nutr. 2012;96(4):932-40.
Dougherty, K. A., Schall, J. I., Kawchak, D. A., Green, M. H., Ohene-Frempong, K., Zemel, B. S., & Stallings, V. A. (2012). No improvement in suboptimal vitamin A status with a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of vitamin A supplementation in children with sickle cell disease. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 96(4), pp. 932-40.
Dougherty KA, et al. No Improvement in Suboptimal Vitamin a Status With a Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial of Vitamin a Supplementation in Children With Sickle Cell Disease. Am J Clin Nutr. 2012;96(4):932-40. PubMed PMID: 22952182.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - No improvement in suboptimal vitamin A status with a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of vitamin A supplementation in children with sickle cell disease. AU - Dougherty,Kelly A, AU - Schall,Joan I, AU - Kawchak,Deborah A, AU - Green,Michael H, AU - Ohene-Frempong,Kwaku, AU - Zemel,Babette S, AU - Stallings,Virginia A, Y1 - 2012/09/05/ PY - 2012/9/7/entrez PY - 2012/9/7/pubmed PY - 2012/12/12/medline SP - 932 EP - 40 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 96 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Suboptimal vitamin A status is prevalent in children with type SS sickle cell disease (SCD-SS) and is associated with hospitalizations and poor growth and hematologic status. The supplemental vitamin A dose that optimizes suboptimal vitamin A status in this population is unknown. OBJECTIVE: The efficacy of Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) doses (based on age and sex) of vitamin A (300, 400, or 600 μg retinyl palmitate/d) or vitamin A + zinc (10 or 20 mg zinc sulfate/d) compared with placebo to optimize vitamin A status was assessed in children aged 2.0-12.9 y with SCD-SS and a suboptimal baseline serum retinol concentration (<30 μg/dL). DESIGN: In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, vitamin A status (serum retinol, prealbumin, retinol-binding protein, and relative-dose-response test) and disease-related illness events were assessed. RESULTS: Twelve months of vitamin A supplementation at the doses recommended for healthy US children (based on age and sex) failed to improve serum retinol values in either group (vitamin A: n = 23; vitamin A + zinc: n = 18) compared with placebo (n = 21). By 12 mo, the increase (±SD) in serum retinol (3.6 ± 2.8 μg/dL) in those taking 600 μg vitamin A/d was significantly different from the decrease (±SD; -2.8 ± 2.4 μg/dL) in those taking 300 μg/d, which possibly suggests a dose-response relation (P < 0.05) with RDA doses. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with placebo, 12 mo of vitamin A supplementation at the RDA for healthy children did not improve serum retinol values in children with SCD-SS, which possibly suggests that higher doses are needed. However, the existence of alternative conclusions emphasizes the need for future research. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22952182/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.112.035725 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -