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Long-term dietary heme iron and red meat intake in relation to endometrial cancer risk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Heme and total iron, present in meat, have been hypothesized to promote carcinogenesis. Few prospective studies have examined the associations between intakes of heme and total iron, types of meat, and endometrial cancer risk.

OBJECTIVE

We evaluated the associations between intakes of heme and total iron, types of meat, and risk of endometrial cancer in a large cohort of women.

DESIGN

Among 60,895 women in the Swedish Mammography Cohort, 720 endometrial cancer cases were confirmed during 21 y of follow-up. RRs and 95% CIs were calculated by Cox proportional hazards models.

RESULTS

A comparison of the highest with the lowest quartile showed a 20-30% higher risk of endometrial cancer for higher intakes of heme iron (RR: 1.24; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.53 for ≥1.63 compared with <0.69 mg/d), total iron (RR: 1.31; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.61 for ≥15.09 compared with <12.27 mg/d), and liver (RR: 1.29; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.56 for ≥100 compared with <100 g/wk). No statistically significant associations were observed between intakes of red and processed meats and endometrial cancer risk. RRs did not greatly differ when we stratified by BMI, parity, and intakes of alcohol, vitamin C, or zinc or when we excluded patients with diabetes.

CONCLUSIONS

Our study suggests a modest positive association between heme iron, total iron, and liver intakes and endometrial cancer risk; no statistically significant associations were observed for intakes of other red and processed meats and endometrial cancer risk.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. jg3081@columbia.edu

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adenocarcinoma
    Adult
    Aged
    Animals
    Cohort Studies
    Diet
    Endometrial Neoplasms
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Heme
    Humans
    Iron, Dietary
    Liver
    Meat
    Meat Products
    Middle Aged
    Proportional Hazards Models
    Risk
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Sweden

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22952183

    Citation

    Genkinger, Jeanine M., et al. "Long-term Dietary Heme Iron and Red Meat Intake in Relation to Endometrial Cancer Risk." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 96, no. 4, 2012, pp. 848-54.
    Genkinger JM, Friberg E, Goldbohm RA, et al. Long-term dietary heme iron and red meat intake in relation to endometrial cancer risk. Am J Clin Nutr. 2012;96(4):848-54.
    Genkinger, J. M., Friberg, E., Goldbohm, R. A., & Wolk, A. (2012). Long-term dietary heme iron and red meat intake in relation to endometrial cancer risk. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 96(4), pp. 848-54.
    Genkinger JM, et al. Long-term Dietary Heme Iron and Red Meat Intake in Relation to Endometrial Cancer Risk. Am J Clin Nutr. 2012;96(4):848-54. PubMed PMID: 22952183.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term dietary heme iron and red meat intake in relation to endometrial cancer risk. AU - Genkinger,Jeanine M, AU - Friberg,Emilie, AU - Goldbohm,R Alexandra, AU - Wolk,Alicja, Y1 - 2012/09/05/ PY - 2012/9/7/entrez PY - 2012/9/7/pubmed PY - 2012/12/12/medline SP - 848 EP - 54 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 96 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Heme and total iron, present in meat, have been hypothesized to promote carcinogenesis. Few prospective studies have examined the associations between intakes of heme and total iron, types of meat, and endometrial cancer risk. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the associations between intakes of heme and total iron, types of meat, and risk of endometrial cancer in a large cohort of women. DESIGN: Among 60,895 women in the Swedish Mammography Cohort, 720 endometrial cancer cases were confirmed during 21 y of follow-up. RRs and 95% CIs were calculated by Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: A comparison of the highest with the lowest quartile showed a 20-30% higher risk of endometrial cancer for higher intakes of heme iron (RR: 1.24; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.53 for ≥1.63 compared with <0.69 mg/d), total iron (RR: 1.31; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.61 for ≥15.09 compared with <12.27 mg/d), and liver (RR: 1.29; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.56 for ≥100 compared with <100 g/wk). No statistically significant associations were observed between intakes of red and processed meats and endometrial cancer risk. RRs did not greatly differ when we stratified by BMI, parity, and intakes of alcohol, vitamin C, or zinc or when we excluded patients with diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests a modest positive association between heme iron, total iron, and liver intakes and endometrial cancer risk; no statistically significant associations were observed for intakes of other red and processed meats and endometrial cancer risk. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22952183/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.112.039537 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -