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Demographic and dietary determinants of constipation in the US population.

Abstract

We investigated the association between self-reported constipation and several demographic and dietary variables in 15,014 men and women 12-74 years of age examined between 1971-75 during the first Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Overall, 12.8 percent reported constipation. Self-reported constipation correlated poorly with stool frequency. Nine percent of those with daily stools and 30.6 percent of those with four to six stools/week, reported constipation. Constipation was more frequent in Blacks (17.3 percent), women (18.2 percent), and those over age 60 (23.3 percent); after adjusting for age, sex, and race it was more prevalent in those with daily inactivity, little leisure exercise, low income, and poor education. Constipated subjects reported lower consumption of cheese, dry beans and peas, milk, meat and poultry, beverages (sweetened, carbonated and noncarbonated), and fruits and vegetables. They reported higher consumption of coffee or tea. They consumed fewer total calories even after controlling for body mass and exercise.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Digestive Diseases, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 27599-7080.

    ,

    Source

    American journal of public health 80:2 1990 Feb pg 185-9

    MeSH

    Activities of Daily Living
    Adolescent
    Adult
    Age Factors
    Aged
    Body Mass Index
    Child
    Constipation
    Continental Population Groups
    Demography
    Diet
    Energy Intake
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Population Surveillance
    Sex Factors
    United States

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    2297063

    Citation

    Sandler, R S., et al. "Demographic and Dietary Determinants of Constipation in the US Population." American Journal of Public Health, vol. 80, no. 2, 1990, pp. 185-9.
    Sandler RS, Jordan MC, Shelton BJ. Demographic and dietary determinants of constipation in the US population. Am J Public Health. 1990;80(2):185-9.
    Sandler, R. S., Jordan, M. C., & Shelton, B. J. (1990). Demographic and dietary determinants of constipation in the US population. American Journal of Public Health, 80(2), pp. 185-9.
    Sandler RS, Jordan MC, Shelton BJ. Demographic and Dietary Determinants of Constipation in the US Population. Am J Public Health. 1990;80(2):185-9. PubMed PMID: 2297063.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Demographic and dietary determinants of constipation in the US population. AU - Sandler,R S, AU - Jordan,M C, AU - Shelton,B J, PY - 1990/2/1/pubmed PY - 1990/2/1/medline PY - 1990/2/1/entrez SP - 185 EP - 9 JF - American journal of public health JO - Am J Public Health VL - 80 IS - 2 N2 - We investigated the association between self-reported constipation and several demographic and dietary variables in 15,014 men and women 12-74 years of age examined between 1971-75 during the first Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Overall, 12.8 percent reported constipation. Self-reported constipation correlated poorly with stool frequency. Nine percent of those with daily stools and 30.6 percent of those with four to six stools/week, reported constipation. Constipation was more frequent in Blacks (17.3 percent), women (18.2 percent), and those over age 60 (23.3 percent); after adjusting for age, sex, and race it was more prevalent in those with daily inactivity, little leisure exercise, low income, and poor education. Constipated subjects reported lower consumption of cheese, dry beans and peas, milk, meat and poultry, beverages (sweetened, carbonated and noncarbonated), and fruits and vegetables. They reported higher consumption of coffee or tea. They consumed fewer total calories even after controlling for body mass and exercise. SN - 0090-0036 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2297063/full_citation L2 - http://www.ajph.org/doi/full/10.2105/ajph.80.2.185?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -