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Synbiotic therapy decreases microbial translocation and inflammation and improves immunological status in HIV-infected patients: a double-blind randomized controlled pilot trial.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

HIV-infection results in damage and dysfunction of the gastrointestinal system. HIV enteropathy includes pronounced CD4+ T-cell loss, increased intestinal permeability, and microbial translocation that promotes systemic immune activation, which is implicated in disease progression. A synbiotic is the combination of probiotics and prebiotics that could improve gut barrier function. Our study goal was to determine whether the use of a synbiotic, probiotics or a prebiotic can recover immunological parameters in HIV-infected subjects through of a reduction of microbial translocation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production.

METHODS

A randomized, double-blind controlled study was performed; twenty Antiretroviral treatment-naïve HIV-infected subjects were subgrouped and assigned to receive a synbiotic, probiotics, a prebiotic, or a placebo throughout 16 weeks.

RESULTS

We had no reports of serious adverse-events. From baseline to week 16, the synbiotic group showed a reduction in bacterial DNA concentrations in plasma (p = 0.048). Moreover, the probiotic and synbiotic groups demonstrated a decrease in total bacterial load in feces (p = 0.05). The probiotic group exhibited a significant increment of beneficial bacteria load (such as Bifidobacterium; p = 0.05) and a decrease in harmful bacteria load (such as Clostridium; p = 0.063). In the synbiotic group, the CD4+ T-cells count increased (median: +102 cells/μL; p = 0.05) and the level of Interleukin 6 cytokine decreased significantly (p = 0.016).

CONCLUSIONS

Our study showed a significant increase in CD4+ T lymphocyte levels in the synbiotic group, which could delay the initiation of antiretroviral therapy and decrease costs in countries with limited resources.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    HIV Unit Hospital Civil de Guadalajara Fray Antonio Alcalde, University of Guadalajara, Calle Hospital 278, Colonia Alcalde Barranquitas, Guadalajara, Jalisco, 44280, Mexico.

    , , , , , ,

    Source

    Nutrition journal 11: 2012 Oct 29 pg 90

    MeSH

    Adult
    Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal
    Bacterial Translocation
    Bifidobacterium
    CD4 Lymphocyte Count
    Cytokines
    DNA, Bacterial
    Disease Progression
    Double-Blind Method
    Feces
    Female
    HIV Enteropathy
    Humans
    Intestinal Mucosa
    Lactobacillus rhamnosus
    Male
    Mexico
    Pilot Projects
    Prebiotics
    Probiotics
    Quality of Life
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    23101545

    Citation

    González-Hernández, Luz A., et al. "Synbiotic Therapy Decreases Microbial Translocation and Inflammation and Improves Immunological Status in HIV-infected Patients: a Double-blind Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial." Nutrition Journal, vol. 11, 2012, p. 90.
    González-Hernández LA, Jave-Suarez LF, Fafutis-Morris M, et al. Synbiotic therapy decreases microbial translocation and inflammation and improves immunological status in HIV-infected patients: a double-blind randomized controlled pilot trial. Nutr J. 2012;11:90.
    González-Hernández, L. A., Jave-Suarez, L. F., Fafutis-Morris, M., Montes-Salcedo, K. E., Valle-Gutierrez, L. G., Campos-Loza, A. E., ... Andrade-Villanueva, J. F. (2012). Synbiotic therapy decreases microbial translocation and inflammation and improves immunological status in HIV-infected patients: a double-blind randomized controlled pilot trial. Nutrition Journal, 11, p. 90. doi:10.1186/1475-2891-11-90.
    González-Hernández LA, et al. Synbiotic Therapy Decreases Microbial Translocation and Inflammation and Improves Immunological Status in HIV-infected Patients: a Double-blind Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial. Nutr J. 2012 Oct 29;11:90. PubMed PMID: 23101545.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Synbiotic therapy decreases microbial translocation and inflammation and improves immunological status in HIV-infected patients: a double-blind randomized controlled pilot trial. AU - González-Hernández,Luz A, AU - Jave-Suarez,Luis F, AU - Fafutis-Morris,Mary, AU - Montes-Salcedo,Karina E, AU - Valle-Gutierrez,Luis G, AU - Campos-Loza,Ariel E, AU - Enciso-Gómez,Luis Fermin, AU - Andrade-Villanueva,Jaime F, Y1 - 2012/10/29/ PY - 2012/03/13/received PY - 2012/10/25/accepted PY - 2012/10/30/entrez PY - 2012/10/30/pubmed PY - 2013/4/13/medline SP - 90 EP - 90 JF - Nutrition journal JO - Nutr J VL - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: HIV-infection results in damage and dysfunction of the gastrointestinal system. HIV enteropathy includes pronounced CD4+ T-cell loss, increased intestinal permeability, and microbial translocation that promotes systemic immune activation, which is implicated in disease progression. A synbiotic is the combination of probiotics and prebiotics that could improve gut barrier function. Our study goal was to determine whether the use of a synbiotic, probiotics or a prebiotic can recover immunological parameters in HIV-infected subjects through of a reduction of microbial translocation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production. METHODS: A randomized, double-blind controlled study was performed; twenty Antiretroviral treatment-naïve HIV-infected subjects were subgrouped and assigned to receive a synbiotic, probiotics, a prebiotic, or a placebo throughout 16 weeks. RESULTS: We had no reports of serious adverse-events. From baseline to week 16, the synbiotic group showed a reduction in bacterial DNA concentrations in plasma (p = 0.048). Moreover, the probiotic and synbiotic groups demonstrated a decrease in total bacterial load in feces (p = 0.05). The probiotic group exhibited a significant increment of beneficial bacteria load (such as Bifidobacterium; p = 0.05) and a decrease in harmful bacteria load (such as Clostridium; p = 0.063). In the synbiotic group, the CD4+ T-cells count increased (median: +102 cells/μL; p = 0.05) and the level of Interleukin 6 cytokine decreased significantly (p = 0.016). CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed a significant increase in CD4+ T lymphocyte levels in the synbiotic group, which could delay the initiation of antiretroviral therapy and decrease costs in countries with limited resources. SN - 1475-2891 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23101545/full_citation L2 - https://nutritionj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1475-2891-11-90 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -