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The prevalence of phosphorus-containing food additives in top-selling foods in grocery stores.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of phosphorus-containing food additives in best-selling processed grocery products and to compare the phosphorus content of a subset of top-selling foods with and without phosphorus additives.

DESIGN

The labels of 2394 best-selling branded grocery products in northeast Ohio were reviewed for phosphorus additives. The top 5 best-selling products containing phosphorus additives from each food category were matched with similar products without phosphorus additives and analyzed for phosphorus content. Four days of sample meals consisting of foods with and without phosphorus additives were created, and daily phosphorus and pricing differentials were computed.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Presence of phosphorus-containing food additives, phosphorus content.

RESULTS

Forty-four percent of the best-selling grocery items contained phosphorus additives. The additives were particularly common in prepared frozen foods (72%), dry food mixes (70%), packaged meat (65%), bread and baked goods (57%), soup (54%), and yogurt (51%) categories. Phosphorus additive-containing foods averaged 67 mg phosphorus/100 g more than matched nonadditive-containing foods (P = .03). Sample meals comprised mostly of phosphorus additive-containing foods had 736 mg more phosphorus per day compared with meals consisting of only additive-free foods. Phosphorus additive-free meals cost an average of $2.00 more per day.

CONCLUSION

Phosphorus additives are common in best-selling processed groceries and contribute significantly to their phosphorus content. Moreover, phosphorus additive foods are less costly than phosphorus additive-free foods. As a result, persons with chronic kidney disease may purchase these popular low-cost groceries and unknowingly increase their intake of highly bioavailable phosphorus.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    MetroHealth Medical Center and Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44109, USA. janeen.leon@case.edu

    ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Databases, Factual
    Diet Surveys
    Food Additives
    Food Supply
    Meals
    Ohio
    Phosphorus, Dietary

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    23402914

    Citation

    TY - JOUR T1 - The prevalence of phosphorus-containing food additives in top-selling foods in grocery stores. AU - León,Janeen B, AU - Sullivan,Catherine M, AU - Sehgal,Ashwini R, Y1 - 2013/02/08/ PY - 2012/10/5/received PY - 2012/11/29/revised PY - 2012/12/1/accepted PY - 2013/2/8/aheadofprint PY - 2013/2/14/entrez PY - 2013/2/14/pubmed PY - 2014/2/5/medline SP - 265 EP - 270.e2 JF - Journal of renal nutrition : the official journal of the Council on Renal Nutrition of the National Kidney Foundation JO - J Ren Nutr VL - 23 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of phosphorus-containing food additives in best-selling processed grocery products and to compare the phosphorus content of a subset of top-selling foods with and without phosphorus additives. DESIGN: The labels of 2394 best-selling branded grocery products in northeast Ohio were reviewed for phosphorus additives. The top 5 best-selling products containing phosphorus additives from each food category were matched with similar products without phosphorus additives and analyzed for phosphorus content. Four days of sample meals consisting of foods with and without phosphorus additives were created, and daily phosphorus and pricing differentials were computed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Presence of phosphorus-containing food additives, phosphorus content. RESULTS: Forty-four percent of the best-selling grocery items contained phosphorus additives. The additives were particularly common in prepared frozen foods (72%), dry food mixes (70%), packaged meat (65%), bread and baked goods (57%), soup (54%), and yogurt (51%) categories. Phosphorus additive-containing foods averaged 67 mg phosphorus/100 g more than matched nonadditive-containing foods (P = .03). Sample meals comprised mostly of phosphorus additive-containing foods had 736 mg more phosphorus per day compared with meals consisting of only additive-free foods. Phosphorus additive-free meals cost an average of $2.00 more per day. CONCLUSION: Phosphorus additives are common in best-selling processed groceries and contribute significantly to their phosphorus content. Moreover, phosphorus additive foods are less costly than phosphorus additive-free foods. As a result, persons with chronic kidney disease may purchase these popular low-cost groceries and unknowingly increase their intake of highly bioavailable phosphorus. SN - 1532-8503 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23402914/full_citation L2 - http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1051-2276(12)00230-0 ER -