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Low-fat yoghurt intake in pregnancy associated with increased child asthma and allergic rhinitis risk: a prospective cohort study.
J Nutr Sci 2012; 1JN

Abstract

Dairy products are important sources of micronutrients, fatty acids and probiotics which could modify the risk of child asthma and allergy development. To examine the association of dairy product intake during pregnancy with child asthma and allergic rhinitis at 18 months and 7 years in the Danish National Birth Cohort, data on milk and yoghurt consumption were collected in mid-pregnancy (25th week of gestation) using a validated FFQ (n 61 909). At 18 months, we evaluated asthma and wheeze using interview data. We assessed asthma and allergic rhinitis using a questionnaire at the age of 7 years and through registry linkages. Current asthma was defined as self-reported ever asthma diagnosis and wheeze in the past 12 months. All associations were evaluated using multivariate logistic regression. At 18 months whole milk was inversely associated with child asthma (≥5.5 times/week v. none: 0.85, 95 % CI 0.75, 0.97); the reverse was true for semi-skimmed milk (≥5.5 times/week v. none: 1.08, 95 % CI 1.02, 1.15). For yoghurt, children of women who ate low-fat yoghurt >1 serving/d had 1.21 (95 % CI 1.02, 1.42) greater odds of a medication-related ever asthma diagnosis compared with children of women reporting no intake. They were also more likely to have a registry-based ever diagnosis and report allergic rhinitis. Low-fat yoghurt intake was directly related to increased risk of both child asthma and allergic rhinitis, while whole milk appeared protective for early-life outcomes only. Nutrient components or additives specific to low-fat yoghurt may be mediating the increase in risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, 02115 MA, USA ; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, 02115 MA, USA ; Centre for Fetal Programming, Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, 2300 Copenhagen, Denmark.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23449856

Citation

Maslova, Ekaterina, et al. "Low-fat Yoghurt Intake in Pregnancy Associated With Increased Child Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis Risk: a Prospective Cohort Study." Journal of Nutritional Science, vol. 1, 2012.
Maslova E, Halldorsson TI, Strøm M, et al. Low-fat yoghurt intake in pregnancy associated with increased child asthma and allergic rhinitis risk: a prospective cohort study. J Nutr Sci. 2012;1.
Maslova, E., Halldorsson, T. I., Strøm, M., & Olsen, S. F. (2012). Low-fat yoghurt intake in pregnancy associated with increased child asthma and allergic rhinitis risk: a prospective cohort study. Journal of Nutritional Science, 1.
Maslova E, et al. Low-fat Yoghurt Intake in Pregnancy Associated With Increased Child Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis Risk: a Prospective Cohort Study. J Nutr Sci. 2012 Jul 6;1 PubMed PMID: 23449856.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Low-fat yoghurt intake in pregnancy associated with increased child asthma and allergic rhinitis risk: a prospective cohort study. AU - Maslova,Ekaterina, AU - Halldorsson,Thorhallur I, AU - Strøm,Marin, AU - Olsen,Sjurdur F, PY - 2013/3/2/entrez PY - 2013/3/2/pubmed PY - 2013/3/2/medline KW - Asthma KW - Cohort studies KW - Maternal nutrition KW - Yoghurt JF - Journal of nutritional science JO - J Nutr Sci VL - 1 N2 - Dairy products are important sources of micronutrients, fatty acids and probiotics which could modify the risk of child asthma and allergy development. To examine the association of dairy product intake during pregnancy with child asthma and allergic rhinitis at 18 months and 7 years in the Danish National Birth Cohort, data on milk and yoghurt consumption were collected in mid-pregnancy (25th week of gestation) using a validated FFQ (n 61 909). At 18 months, we evaluated asthma and wheeze using interview data. We assessed asthma and allergic rhinitis using a questionnaire at the age of 7 years and through registry linkages. Current asthma was defined as self-reported ever asthma diagnosis and wheeze in the past 12 months. All associations were evaluated using multivariate logistic regression. At 18 months whole milk was inversely associated with child asthma (≥5.5 times/week v. none: 0.85, 95 % CI 0.75, 0.97); the reverse was true for semi-skimmed milk (≥5.5 times/week v. none: 1.08, 95 % CI 1.02, 1.15). For yoghurt, children of women who ate low-fat yoghurt >1 serving/d had 1.21 (95 % CI 1.02, 1.42) greater odds of a medication-related ever asthma diagnosis compared with children of women reporting no intake. They were also more likely to have a registry-based ever diagnosis and report allergic rhinitis. Low-fat yoghurt intake was directly related to increased risk of both child asthma and allergic rhinitis, while whole milk appeared protective for early-life outcomes only. Nutrient components or additives specific to low-fat yoghurt may be mediating the increase in risk. SN - 2048-6790 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23449856/full_citation L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/23449856/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -