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Dietary patterns and gastric cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Declines in gastric cancer (GC) incidence and mortality have been related to improvements in diet. It is therefore important to consider dietary patterns.

DESIGN

We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature through Medline and Embase databases.

RESULTS

We identified 16 papers, of these 9 derived dietary patterns through an a posteriori method, 5 through a priori scores, and 2 used both approaches. Eight studies that used the a posteriori approach were considered for the meta-analysis. A favorable role on GC emerged for the 'Prudent/healthy', with an odds ratio (OR) of 0.75 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.63-0.90], for the highest versus the lowest category. Similar results emerged for separate anatomical subtypes. An unfavorable role on GC emerged for the 'Western/unhealthy' dietary pattern, with an OR of 1.51 (95% CI: 1.21-1.89). This association was weaker for the distal/NOS (not otherwise specified) category (OR = 1.36) compared with the cardia GC (OR = 2.05). Among the a priori scores, the ORs ranged from 0.2 to 0.7 for the favorable and from 1.8 to 6.9 for the unfavorable ones.

CONCLUSION

There is a ~2-fold difference in GC risk between a 'Prudent/healthy' diet-rich in fruits and vegetables, and a 'Western/unhealthy' diet-rich in starchy foods, meat and fats.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, IRCCS, Milan, Italy. paola.bertuccio@marionegri.it

    , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Dietary Fats
    Dietary Sucrose
    Feeding Behavior
    Fruit
    Humans
    Meat
    Risk Factors
    Stomach Neoplasms
    Vegetables

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Meta-Analysis
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Review
    Systematic Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    23524862

    Citation

    Bertuccio, P, et al. "Dietary Patterns and Gastric Cancer Risk: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis." Annals of Oncology : Official Journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology, vol. 24, no. 6, 2013, pp. 1450-8.
    Bertuccio P, Rosato V, Andreano A, et al. Dietary patterns and gastric cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Ann Oncol. 2013;24(6):1450-8.
    Bertuccio, P., Rosato, V., Andreano, A., Ferraroni, M., Decarli, A., Edefonti, V., & La Vecchia, C. (2013). Dietary patterns and gastric cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Annals of Oncology : Official Journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology, 24(6), pp. 1450-8. doi:10.1093/annonc/mdt108.
    Bertuccio P, et al. Dietary Patterns and Gastric Cancer Risk: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Ann Oncol. 2013;24(6):1450-8. PubMed PMID: 23524862.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary patterns and gastric cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis. AU - Bertuccio,P, AU - Rosato,V, AU - Andreano,A, AU - Ferraroni,M, AU - Decarli,A, AU - Edefonti,V, AU - La Vecchia,C, Y1 - 2013/03/22/ PY - 2013/3/26/entrez PY - 2013/3/26/pubmed PY - 2013/11/19/medline KW - dietary patterns KW - gastric cancer KW - meta-analysis KW - review KW - score SP - 1450 EP - 8 JF - Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology JO - Ann. Oncol. VL - 24 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Declines in gastric cancer (GC) incidence and mortality have been related to improvements in diet. It is therefore important to consider dietary patterns. DESIGN: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature through Medline and Embase databases. RESULTS: We identified 16 papers, of these 9 derived dietary patterns through an a posteriori method, 5 through a priori scores, and 2 used both approaches. Eight studies that used the a posteriori approach were considered for the meta-analysis. A favorable role on GC emerged for the 'Prudent/healthy', with an odds ratio (OR) of 0.75 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.63-0.90], for the highest versus the lowest category. Similar results emerged for separate anatomical subtypes. An unfavorable role on GC emerged for the 'Western/unhealthy' dietary pattern, with an OR of 1.51 (95% CI: 1.21-1.89). This association was weaker for the distal/NOS (not otherwise specified) category (OR = 1.36) compared with the cardia GC (OR = 2.05). Among the a priori scores, the ORs ranged from 0.2 to 0.7 for the favorable and from 1.8 to 6.9 for the unfavorable ones. CONCLUSION: There is a ~2-fold difference in GC risk between a 'Prudent/healthy' diet-rich in fruits and vegetables, and a 'Western/unhealthy' diet-rich in starchy foods, meat and fats. SN - 1569-8041 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23524862/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/annonc/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/annonc/mdt108 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -