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Prevalence and reasons for introducing infants early to solid foods: variations by milk feeding type.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the prevalence of, and mothers' self-reported reasons for, introducing solid foods to infants earlier than recommended (aged <4 months) and the variation in reasons for early introduction by milk feeding type.

METHODS

The study included 1334 mothers who participated in the national longitudinal Infant Feeding Practices Study II (2005-2007). Monthly 7-day food-frequency questions throughout infancy were used to determine infant age at solid food introduction and to classify infant's milk feeding at introduction as breast milk only, formula only, or mixed. Reasons for introducing solid foods at age <4 months were assessed through maternal responses to a list of 12 potential reasons. Analyses included descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regression.

RESULTS

Overall, 40.4% of mothers introduced solid foods before age 4 months. Prevalence varied by milk feeding type (24.3%, 52.7%, and 50.2% for breastfed, formula-fed, and mixed-fed infants, respectively). The most commonly cited reasons for early introduction of solid food were as follows: "My baby was old enough," "My baby seemed hungry," "I wanted to feed my baby something in addition to breast milk or formula," "My baby wanted the food I ate," "A doctor or other health care professional said my baby should begin eating solid food," and "It would help my baby sleep longer at night." Four of these reasons varied by milk feeding type.

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings highlight the high prevalence of early introduction of solids and provide details on why mothers introduced solid foods early.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Epidemic Intelligence Service, Office of Workforce Development, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA. hhc9@cdc.gov

    , ,

    Source

    Pediatrics 131:4 2013 Apr pg e1108-14

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Age Factors
    Breast Feeding
    Diet
    Diet Surveys
    Feeding Methods
    Female
    Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
    Humans
    Infant
    Infant Care
    Infant Formula
    Logistic Models
    Longitudinal Studies
    Maternal Behavior
    Multivariate Analysis
    Practice Guidelines as Topic
    Prospective Studies
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    United States
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    23530169

    Citation

    Clayton, Heather B., et al. "Prevalence and Reasons for Introducing Infants Early to Solid Foods: Variations By Milk Feeding Type." Pediatrics, vol. 131, no. 4, 2013, pp. e1108-14.
    Clayton HB, Li R, Perrine CG, et al. Prevalence and reasons for introducing infants early to solid foods: variations by milk feeding type. Pediatrics. 2013;131(4):e1108-14.
    Clayton, H. B., Li, R., Perrine, C. G., & Scanlon, K. S. (2013). Prevalence and reasons for introducing infants early to solid foods: variations by milk feeding type. Pediatrics, 131(4), pp. e1108-14. doi:10.1542/peds.2012-2265.
    Clayton HB, et al. Prevalence and Reasons for Introducing Infants Early to Solid Foods: Variations By Milk Feeding Type. Pediatrics. 2013;131(4):e1108-14. PubMed PMID: 23530169.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence and reasons for introducing infants early to solid foods: variations by milk feeding type. AU - Clayton,Heather B, AU - Li,Ruowei, AU - Perrine,Cria G, AU - Scanlon,Kelley S, Y1 - 2013/03/25/ PY - 2013/3/27/entrez PY - 2013/3/27/pubmed PY - 2013/5/22/medline SP - e1108 EP - 14 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 131 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the prevalence of, and mothers' self-reported reasons for, introducing solid foods to infants earlier than recommended (aged <4 months) and the variation in reasons for early introduction by milk feeding type. METHODS: The study included 1334 mothers who participated in the national longitudinal Infant Feeding Practices Study II (2005-2007). Monthly 7-day food-frequency questions throughout infancy were used to determine infant age at solid food introduction and to classify infant's milk feeding at introduction as breast milk only, formula only, or mixed. Reasons for introducing solid foods at age <4 months were assessed through maternal responses to a list of 12 potential reasons. Analyses included descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: Overall, 40.4% of mothers introduced solid foods before age 4 months. Prevalence varied by milk feeding type (24.3%, 52.7%, and 50.2% for breastfed, formula-fed, and mixed-fed infants, respectively). The most commonly cited reasons for early introduction of solid food were as follows: "My baby was old enough," "My baby seemed hungry," "I wanted to feed my baby something in addition to breast milk or formula," "My baby wanted the food I ate," "A doctor or other health care professional said my baby should begin eating solid food," and "It would help my baby sleep longer at night." Four of these reasons varied by milk feeding type. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings highlight the high prevalence of early introduction of solids and provide details on why mothers introduced solid foods early. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23530169/full_citation L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=23530169 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -