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Prospective associations between sugar-sweetened beverage intakes and cardiometabolic risk factors in adolescents.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

High sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption is associated with cardiometabolic disturbances in adults, but this relation is relatively unexplored in children and adolescents.

OBJECTIVE

We tested the hypothesis that higher SSB intakes are associated with increases in cardiometabolic risk factors between 14 and 17 y of age.

DESIGN

Data were provided by 1433 adolescent offspring from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. At 14 and 17 y of age, SSB intakes were estimated by using a food-frequency questionnaire; body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting serum lipids, glucose, and insulin were measured, and overall cardiometabolic risk was estimated. Prospective associations between cardiovascular disease risk factors and SSB intake were examined with adjustment for age, pubertal stage, physical fitness, socioeconomic status, and major dietary patterns.

RESULTS

The average SSB intake in consumers (89%) was 335 g/d or 1.3 servings/d. Girls who moved into the top tertile of SSB consumption (>1.3 servings/d) between 14 and 17 y of age had increases in BMI (3.8%; 95% CI: 1.8%, 5.7%), increased overweight and obesity risk (OR: 4.8, 95% CI: 2.1, 11.4), and greater overall cardiometabolic risk (OR: 3.2; 95% CI: 1.6, 6.2) (all P-trend ≤ 0.001). Girls and boys who moved into the top tertile of SSB intake showed increases in triglycerides (7.0-8.4%; P-trend ≤ 0.03), and boys showed reductions in HDL cholesterol (-3.1%; 95% CI: -6.2%, 0.1%; P-trend < 0.04) independent of BMI. Some associations were attenuated after adjustment for major dietary patterns.

CONCLUSION

Increased SSB intake may be an important predictor of cardiometabolic risk in young people, independent of weight status.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Medical Research Council Human Nutrition Research, Elsie Widdowson Laboratory, Cambridge, UK. gina.ambrosini@mrc-hnr.cam.ac.uk

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    Source

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Beverages
    Blood Pressure
    Body Mass Index
    Body Weight
    Cardiovascular Diseases
    Cholesterol, HDL
    Dietary Sucrose
    Fasting
    Female
    Humans
    Insulin
    Male
    Motor Activity
    Obesity
    Overweight
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Factors
    Socioeconomic Factors
    Sweetening Agents
    Triglycerides
    Waist Circumference
    Western Australia

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    23719557

    Citation

    Ambrosini, Gina Leslie, et al. "Prospective Associations Between Sugar-sweetened Beverage Intakes and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Adolescents." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 98, no. 2, 2013, pp. 327-34.
    Ambrosini GL, Oddy WH, Huang RC, et al. Prospective associations between sugar-sweetened beverage intakes and cardiometabolic risk factors in adolescents. Am J Clin Nutr. 2013;98(2):327-34.
    Ambrosini, G. L., Oddy, W. H., Huang, R. C., Mori, T. A., Beilin, L. J., & Jebb, S. A. (2013). Prospective associations between sugar-sweetened beverage intakes and cardiometabolic risk factors in adolescents. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 98(2), pp. 327-34. doi:10.3945/ajcn.112.051383.
    Ambrosini GL, et al. Prospective Associations Between Sugar-sweetened Beverage Intakes and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Adolescents. Am J Clin Nutr. 2013;98(2):327-34. PubMed PMID: 23719557.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Prospective associations between sugar-sweetened beverage intakes and cardiometabolic risk factors in adolescents. AU - Ambrosini,Gina Leslie, AU - Oddy,Wendy Hazel, AU - Huang,Rae Chi, AU - Mori,Trevor Anthony, AU - Beilin,Lawrence Joseph, AU - Jebb,Susan Ann, Y1 - 2013/05/29/ PY - 2013/5/31/entrez PY - 2013/5/31/pubmed PY - 2013/9/24/medline SP - 327 EP - 34 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 98 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: High sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption is associated with cardiometabolic disturbances in adults, but this relation is relatively unexplored in children and adolescents. OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that higher SSB intakes are associated with increases in cardiometabolic risk factors between 14 and 17 y of age. DESIGN: Data were provided by 1433 adolescent offspring from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. At 14 and 17 y of age, SSB intakes were estimated by using a food-frequency questionnaire; body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting serum lipids, glucose, and insulin were measured, and overall cardiometabolic risk was estimated. Prospective associations between cardiovascular disease risk factors and SSB intake were examined with adjustment for age, pubertal stage, physical fitness, socioeconomic status, and major dietary patterns. RESULTS: The average SSB intake in consumers (89%) was 335 g/d or 1.3 servings/d. Girls who moved into the top tertile of SSB consumption (>1.3 servings/d) between 14 and 17 y of age had increases in BMI (3.8%; 95% CI: 1.8%, 5.7%), increased overweight and obesity risk (OR: 4.8, 95% CI: 2.1, 11.4), and greater overall cardiometabolic risk (OR: 3.2; 95% CI: 1.6, 6.2) (all P-trend ≤ 0.001). Girls and boys who moved into the top tertile of SSB intake showed increases in triglycerides (7.0-8.4%; P-trend ≤ 0.03), and boys showed reductions in HDL cholesterol (-3.1%; 95% CI: -6.2%, 0.1%; P-trend < 0.04) independent of BMI. Some associations were attenuated after adjustment for major dietary patterns. CONCLUSION: Increased SSB intake may be an important predictor of cardiometabolic risk in young people, independent of weight status. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23719557/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.112.051383 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -