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Association between red and processed meat intake and mortality among colorectal cancer survivors.
J Clin Oncol 2013; 31(22):2773-82JC

Abstract

PURPOSE

Red and processed meat intake is convincingly associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence, but its impact on prognosis after CRC diagnosis is unknown. We examined associations of red and processed meat consumption, self-reported before and after cancer diagnosis, with all-cause and cause-specific mortality among men and women with invasive, nonmetastatic CRC.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

Participants in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort reported information on diet and other factors at baseline in 1992-1993, 1999, and 2003. Participants with a verified CRC diagnosis after baseline and up to June 30, 2009, were observed for mortality through December 31, 2010.

RESULTS

Among 2,315 participants diagnosed with CRC, 966 died during follow-up (413 from CRC and 176 from cardiovascular disease [CVD]). In multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models, red and processed meat intake before CRC diagnosis was associated with higher risks of death as a result of all causes (top v bottom quartile, relative risk [RR], 1.29; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.59; Ptrend = .03) and from CVD (RR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.00 to 2.67; Ptrend = .08) but not CRC (RR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.79 to 1.51; Ptrend = 0.54). Although red and processed meat consumption after CRC diagnosis was not associated with mortality, survivors with consistently high (median or higher) intakes before and after diagnosis had a higher risk of CRC-specific mortality (RR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.11 to 2.89) compared with those with consistently low intakes.

CONCLUSION

This study suggests that greater red and processed meat intake before diagnosis is associated with higher risk of death among patients with nonmetastatic CRC.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA 30303-1002, USA. marji.mccullough@cancer.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23816965

Citation

McCullough, Marjorie L., et al. "Association Between Red and Processed Meat Intake and Mortality Among Colorectal Cancer Survivors." Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, vol. 31, no. 22, 2013, pp. 2773-82.
McCullough ML, Gapstur SM, Shah R, et al. Association between red and processed meat intake and mortality among colorectal cancer survivors. J Clin Oncol. 2013;31(22):2773-82.
McCullough, M. L., Gapstur, S. M., Shah, R., Jacobs, E. J., & Campbell, P. T. (2013). Association between red and processed meat intake and mortality among colorectal cancer survivors. Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, 31(22), pp. 2773-82. doi:10.1200/JCO.2013.49.1126.
McCullough ML, et al. Association Between Red and Processed Meat Intake and Mortality Among Colorectal Cancer Survivors. J Clin Oncol. 2013 Aug 1;31(22):2773-82. PubMed PMID: 23816965.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between red and processed meat intake and mortality among colorectal cancer survivors. AU - McCullough,Marjorie L, AU - Gapstur,Susan M, AU - Shah,Roma, AU - Jacobs,Eric J, AU - Campbell,Peter T, Y1 - 2013/07/01/ PY - 2013/7/3/entrez PY - 2013/7/3/pubmed PY - 2013/10/1/medline SP - 2773 EP - 82 JF - Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology JO - J. Clin. Oncol. VL - 31 IS - 22 N2 - PURPOSE: Red and processed meat intake is convincingly associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence, but its impact on prognosis after CRC diagnosis is unknown. We examined associations of red and processed meat consumption, self-reported before and after cancer diagnosis, with all-cause and cause-specific mortality among men and women with invasive, nonmetastatic CRC. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Participants in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort reported information on diet and other factors at baseline in 1992-1993, 1999, and 2003. Participants with a verified CRC diagnosis after baseline and up to June 30, 2009, were observed for mortality through December 31, 2010. RESULTS: Among 2,315 participants diagnosed with CRC, 966 died during follow-up (413 from CRC and 176 from cardiovascular disease [CVD]). In multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models, red and processed meat intake before CRC diagnosis was associated with higher risks of death as a result of all causes (top v bottom quartile, relative risk [RR], 1.29; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.59; Ptrend = .03) and from CVD (RR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.00 to 2.67; Ptrend = .08) but not CRC (RR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.79 to 1.51; Ptrend = 0.54). Although red and processed meat consumption after CRC diagnosis was not associated with mortality, survivors with consistently high (median or higher) intakes before and after diagnosis had a higher risk of CRC-specific mortality (RR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.11 to 2.89) compared with those with consistently low intakes. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that greater red and processed meat intake before diagnosis is associated with higher risk of death among patients with nonmetastatic CRC. SN - 1527-7755 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23816965/full_citation L2 - http://ascopubs.org/doi/full/10.1200/JCO.2013.49.1126?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -