Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

High dietary glycemic load increases the risk of non-gallstone-related acute pancreatitis: a prospective cohort study.
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2014; 12(4):676-82CG

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS

Obesity and type 2 diabetes--diseases linked to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance--have been positively associated with the risk of acute pancreatitis. However, it is unclear whether consumption of foods that increase postprandial glycemia and insulinemia have similar associations. We examined the association between dietary glycemic load and risk of non-gallstone-related acute pancreatitis.

METHODS

We performed a prospective study of 44,791 men and 36,309 women (aged 45-84 years), without a history of acute pancreatitis, from the Cohort of Swedish Men and the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Glycemic loads were calculated from food frequency questionnaire data collected in 1997, and participants were followed for the development of non-gallstone-related acute pancreatitis through 2010 via linkage to the Swedish National Patient Register. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard models.

RESULTS

During a total follow-up of 967,568 person-years, there were 364 cases of incident non-gallstone-related acute pancreatitis (236 in men and 128 in women). Incidence rates, standardized for age and sex, were 49 cases per 100,000 person-years in the highest quartile of glycemic load and 33 cases per 100,000 person-years in the lowest. The multivariate-adjusted HR of non-gallstone-related acute pancreatitis was 1.60 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.17-2.18) for the highest compared with the lowest quartile. Every 50-unit increase in glycemic load per day (∼ 3 servings of white bread) had an HR of 1.38 in men (95% CI, 1.11-1.72) and women (95% CI, 1.02-1.86).

CONCLUSIONS

Based on a large, prospective cohort study, diets with high glycemic load are associated with an increased risk of non-gallstone-related acute pancreatitis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: viktor.oskarsson@ki.se.Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Unit of Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24100113

Citation

Oskarsson, Viktor, et al. "High Dietary Glycemic Load Increases the Risk of Non-gallstone-related Acute Pancreatitis: a Prospective Cohort Study." Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology : the Official Clinical Practice Journal of the American Gastroenterological Association, vol. 12, no. 4, 2014, pp. 676-82.
Oskarsson V, Sadr-Azodi O, Orsini N, et al. High dietary glycemic load increases the risk of non-gallstone-related acute pancreatitis: a prospective cohort study. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014;12(4):676-82.
Oskarsson, V., Sadr-Azodi, O., Orsini, N., Andrén-Sandberg, Å., & Wolk, A. (2014). High dietary glycemic load increases the risk of non-gallstone-related acute pancreatitis: a prospective cohort study. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology : the Official Clinical Practice Journal of the American Gastroenterological Association, 12(4), pp. 676-82. doi:10.1016/j.cgh.2013.09.058.
Oskarsson V, et al. High Dietary Glycemic Load Increases the Risk of Non-gallstone-related Acute Pancreatitis: a Prospective Cohort Study. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014;12(4):676-82. PubMed PMID: 24100113.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - High dietary glycemic load increases the risk of non-gallstone-related acute pancreatitis: a prospective cohort study. AU - Oskarsson,Viktor, AU - Sadr-Azodi,Omid, AU - Orsini,Nicola, AU - Andrén-Sandberg,Åke, AU - Wolk,Alicja, Y1 - 2013/10/05/ PY - 2013/05/27/received PY - 2013/09/20/revised PY - 2013/09/23/accepted PY - 2013/10/9/entrez PY - 2013/10/9/pubmed PY - 2014/11/5/medline KW - Carbohydrate KW - Inflammation KW - Pancreas KW - Sweden SP - 676 EP - 82 JF - Clinical gastroenterology and hepatology : the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association JO - Clin. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. VL - 12 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND & AIMS: Obesity and type 2 diabetes--diseases linked to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance--have been positively associated with the risk of acute pancreatitis. However, it is unclear whether consumption of foods that increase postprandial glycemia and insulinemia have similar associations. We examined the association between dietary glycemic load and risk of non-gallstone-related acute pancreatitis. METHODS: We performed a prospective study of 44,791 men and 36,309 women (aged 45-84 years), without a history of acute pancreatitis, from the Cohort of Swedish Men and the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Glycemic loads were calculated from food frequency questionnaire data collected in 1997, and participants were followed for the development of non-gallstone-related acute pancreatitis through 2010 via linkage to the Swedish National Patient Register. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard models. RESULTS: During a total follow-up of 967,568 person-years, there were 364 cases of incident non-gallstone-related acute pancreatitis (236 in men and 128 in women). Incidence rates, standardized for age and sex, were 49 cases per 100,000 person-years in the highest quartile of glycemic load and 33 cases per 100,000 person-years in the lowest. The multivariate-adjusted HR of non-gallstone-related acute pancreatitis was 1.60 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.17-2.18) for the highest compared with the lowest quartile. Every 50-unit increase in glycemic load per day (∼ 3 servings of white bread) had an HR of 1.38 in men (95% CI, 1.11-1.72) and women (95% CI, 1.02-1.86). CONCLUSIONS: Based on a large, prospective cohort study, diets with high glycemic load are associated with an increased risk of non-gallstone-related acute pancreatitis. SN - 1542-7714 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24100113/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1542-3565(13)01506-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -