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Sugar-sweetened beverage intake and the risk of type I and type II endometrial cancer among postmenopausal women.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake has been associated with an increased risk of obesity and type II diabetes. However, its association with endometrial cancer is unclear.

METHODS

We evaluated dietary intake of SSB, fruit juice, sugar-free beverages, sweets/baked goods, starch, and sugars among 23,039 postmenopausal women in the Iowa Women's Health Study. Incident estrogen-dependent type I and estrogen-independent type II endometrial cancers were identified via linkage with the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results Registry. Risks of type I and type II endometrial cancers were separately compared by energy-adjusted dietary intake in Cox proportional hazards regression models.

RESULTS

From 1986 to 2010, 506 type I and 89 type II incident endometrial cancers were identified. An increased risk of type I endometrial cancer was observed with increasing SSB intake after adjustment for body mass index (BMI) and other cofounders (Ptrend = 0.0005). Compared with nondrinkers of SSB, the risk was 78% higher [95% confidence intervals (CI), 1.32-2.40] among women in the highest quintile of SSB intake. The observed association was not modified by BMI, physical activity, history of diabetes, or cigarette smoking. Higher risk of type I endometrial cancer was also observed with higher intake of sugars. None of the dietary items included in the analysis was associated with type II endometrial cancer risk.

CONCLUSION

Higher intake of SSB and sugars was associated with an increased risk of type I, but not type II, endometrial cancer.

IMPACT

SSB intake may be a risk factor for type I endometrial cancer regardless of other lifestyle factors.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

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    Authors' Affiliations: Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota; Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine; Division of Epidemiology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota; and Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health and Health Services, George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia.

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    MeSH

    Aged
    Beverages
    Body Mass Index
    Cohort Studies
    Endometrial Neoplasms
    Female
    Humans
    Incidence
    Iowa
    Middle Aged
    Obesity
    Postmenopause
    Proportional Hazards Models
    Risk Factors
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Sweetening Agents

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    24273064

    Citation

    Inoue-Choi, Maki, et al. "Sugar-sweetened Beverage Intake and the Risk of Type I and Type II Endometrial Cancer Among Postmenopausal Women." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 22, no. 12, 2013, pp. 2384-94.
    Inoue-Choi M, Robien K, Mariani A, et al. Sugar-sweetened beverage intake and the risk of type I and type II endometrial cancer among postmenopausal women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2013;22(12):2384-94.
    Inoue-Choi, M., Robien, K., Mariani, A., Cerhan, J. R., & Anderson, K. E. (2013). Sugar-sweetened beverage intake and the risk of type I and type II endometrial cancer among postmenopausal women. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 22(12), pp. 2384-94. doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-0636.
    Inoue-Choi M, et al. Sugar-sweetened Beverage Intake and the Risk of Type I and Type II Endometrial Cancer Among Postmenopausal Women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2013;22(12):2384-94. PubMed PMID: 24273064.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Sugar-sweetened beverage intake and the risk of type I and type II endometrial cancer among postmenopausal women. AU - Inoue-Choi,Maki, AU - Robien,Kim, AU - Mariani,Andrea, AU - Cerhan,James R, AU - Anderson,Kristin E, Y1 - 2013/11/22/ PY - 2013/11/26/entrez PY - 2013/11/26/pubmed PY - 2014/10/3/medline SP - 2384 EP - 94 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 22 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake has been associated with an increased risk of obesity and type II diabetes. However, its association with endometrial cancer is unclear. METHODS: We evaluated dietary intake of SSB, fruit juice, sugar-free beverages, sweets/baked goods, starch, and sugars among 23,039 postmenopausal women in the Iowa Women's Health Study. Incident estrogen-dependent type I and estrogen-independent type II endometrial cancers were identified via linkage with the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results Registry. Risks of type I and type II endometrial cancers were separately compared by energy-adjusted dietary intake in Cox proportional hazards regression models. RESULTS: From 1986 to 2010, 506 type I and 89 type II incident endometrial cancers were identified. An increased risk of type I endometrial cancer was observed with increasing SSB intake after adjustment for body mass index (BMI) and other cofounders (Ptrend = 0.0005). Compared with nondrinkers of SSB, the risk was 78% higher [95% confidence intervals (CI), 1.32-2.40] among women in the highest quintile of SSB intake. The observed association was not modified by BMI, physical activity, history of diabetes, or cigarette smoking. Higher risk of type I endometrial cancer was also observed with higher intake of sugars. None of the dietary items included in the analysis was associated with type II endometrial cancer risk. CONCLUSION: Higher intake of SSB and sugars was associated with an increased risk of type I, but not type II, endometrial cancer. IMPACT: SSB intake may be a risk factor for type I endometrial cancer regardless of other lifestyle factors. SN - 1538-7755 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24273064/full_citation L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=24273064 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -