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Vitamin C intake, circulating vitamin C and risk of stroke: a meta-analysis of prospective studies.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Though vitamin C supplementation has shown no observed effects on stroke prevention in several clinical trials, uncertainty remains as to whether long-term, low-dose intake influences the development of stroke among general populations. Furthermore, the association between circulating vitamin C and the risk of stroke is also unclear. For further clarification of these issues, we conducted a meta-analysis of prospective studies.

METHODS AND RESULTS

PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched, and the bibliographies of the retrieved articles were also reviewed to identify eligible studies. Summary relative risk (RRs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed with a random-effects model. The summary RR for the high-versus-low categories was 0.81 (95% CI: 0.74 to 0.90) for dietary vitamin C intake (11 studies), and 0.62 (95% CI: 0.49 to 0.79) for circulating vitamin C (6 studies). The summary RR for each 100 mg/day increment in dietary vitamin C was 0.83 (95% CI: 0.75 to 0.93) (10 studies), and for each 20 μmol/L increment in circulating vitamin C was 0.81 (95% CI: 0.75 to 0.88) (5 studies). Few studies reported results for vitamin C supplements (RR for high-versus-low intake=0.83, 95% CI: 0.62 to 1.10, 3 studies).

CONCLUSIONS

This meta-analysis suggests significant inverse relationships between dietary vitamin C intake, circulating vitamin C, and risk of stroke.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Soochow University, Suzhou, China.

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Ascorbic Acid
    Ascorbic Acid Deficiency
    Biomarkers
    Dietary Supplements
    Humans
    Prognosis
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Factors
    Stroke
    Time Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Meta-Analysis
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    24284213

    Citation

    Chen, Guo-Chong, et al. "Vitamin C Intake, Circulating Vitamin C and Risk of Stroke: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Studies." Journal of the American Heart Association, vol. 2, no. 6, 2013, pp. e000329.
    Chen GC, Lu DB, Pang Z, et al. Vitamin C intake, circulating vitamin C and risk of stroke: a meta-analysis of prospective studies. J Am Heart Assoc. 2013;2(6):e000329.
    Chen, G. C., Lu, D. B., Pang, Z., & Liu, Q. F. (2013). Vitamin C intake, circulating vitamin C and risk of stroke: a meta-analysis of prospective studies. Journal of the American Heart Association, 2(6), pp. e000329. doi:10.1161/JAHA.113.000329.
    Chen GC, et al. Vitamin C Intake, Circulating Vitamin C and Risk of Stroke: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Studies. J Am Heart Assoc. 2013 Nov 27;2(6):e000329. PubMed PMID: 24284213.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin C intake, circulating vitamin C and risk of stroke: a meta-analysis of prospective studies. AU - Chen,Guo-Chong, AU - Lu,Da-Bing, AU - Pang,Zhi, AU - Liu,Qing-Fang, Y1 - 2013/11/27/ PY - 2013/11/29/entrez PY - 2013/11/29/pubmed PY - 2014/6/17/medline KW - antioxidants KW - diet KW - meta‐analysis KW - prevention KW - stroke SP - e000329 EP - e000329 JF - Journal of the American Heart Association JO - J Am Heart Assoc VL - 2 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Though vitamin C supplementation has shown no observed effects on stroke prevention in several clinical trials, uncertainty remains as to whether long-term, low-dose intake influences the development of stroke among general populations. Furthermore, the association between circulating vitamin C and the risk of stroke is also unclear. For further clarification of these issues, we conducted a meta-analysis of prospective studies. METHODS AND RESULTS: PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched, and the bibliographies of the retrieved articles were also reviewed to identify eligible studies. Summary relative risk (RRs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed with a random-effects model. The summary RR for the high-versus-low categories was 0.81 (95% CI: 0.74 to 0.90) for dietary vitamin C intake (11 studies), and 0.62 (95% CI: 0.49 to 0.79) for circulating vitamin C (6 studies). The summary RR for each 100 mg/day increment in dietary vitamin C was 0.83 (95% CI: 0.75 to 0.93) (10 studies), and for each 20 μmol/L increment in circulating vitamin C was 0.81 (95% CI: 0.75 to 0.88) (5 studies). Few studies reported results for vitamin C supplements (RR for high-versus-low intake=0.83, 95% CI: 0.62 to 1.10, 3 studies). CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis suggests significant inverse relationships between dietary vitamin C intake, circulating vitamin C, and risk of stroke. SN - 2047-9980 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24284213/full_citation L2 - http://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/JAHA.113.000329?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -