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Vitamin B12 supplementation in treating major depressive disorder: a randomized controlled trial.
Open Neurol J 2013; 7:44-8ON

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE

Recent literature has identified links between vitamin B12 deficiency and depression.We compared the clinical response of SSRI-monotherapy with that of B12-augmentation in a sample of depressed patients with low normal B12 levels who responded inadequately to the first trial with the SSRIs.

METHODS

Patients with depression and low normal B12 levels were randomized to a control arm (antidepressant only) or treatment arm (antidepressants and injectable vitamin B12 supplementation).

RESULTS

A total of 199 depressed patients were screened. Out of 73 patients with low normal B12 levels 34 (47%) were randomized to the treatment group while 39 (53%) were randomized to the control arm. At three months follow up 100% of the treatment group showed at least a 20% reduction in HAM-D score, while only 69% in the control arm showed at least a 20% reduction in HAM-D score (p<0.001). The findings remained significant after adjusting for baseline HAM-D score (p=0.001).

CONCLUSION

Vitamin B12 supplementation with antidepressants significantly improved depressive symptoms in our cohort.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry Penn State Milton S Hershey Medical Center Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24339839

Citation

Syed, Ehsan Ullah, et al. "Vitamin B12 Supplementation in Treating Major Depressive Disorder: a Randomized Controlled Trial." The Open Neurology Journal, vol. 7, 2013, pp. 44-8.
Syed EU, Wasay M, Awan S. Vitamin B12 supplementation in treating major depressive disorder: a randomized controlled trial. Open Neurol J. 2013;7:44-8.
Syed, E. U., Wasay, M., & Awan, S. (2013). Vitamin B12 supplementation in treating major depressive disorder: a randomized controlled trial. The Open Neurology Journal, 7, pp. 44-8. doi:10.2174/1874205X01307010044.
Syed EU, Wasay M, Awan S. Vitamin B12 Supplementation in Treating Major Depressive Disorder: a Randomized Controlled Trial. Open Neurol J. 2013;7:44-8. PubMed PMID: 24339839.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin B12 supplementation in treating major depressive disorder: a randomized controlled trial. AU - Syed,Ehsan Ullah, AU - Wasay,Mohammad, AU - Awan,Safia, Y1 - 2013/11/15/ PY - 2013/06/28/received PY - 2013/09/06/revised PY - 2013/09/08/accepted PY - 2013/12/17/entrez PY - 2013/12/18/pubmed PY - 2013/12/18/medline KW - Depression KW - RCT. KW - antidepressants KW - vitamin B12 SP - 44 EP - 8 JF - The open neurology journal JO - Open Neurol J VL - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Recent literature has identified links between vitamin B12 deficiency and depression.We compared the clinical response of SSRI-monotherapy with that of B12-augmentation in a sample of depressed patients with low normal B12 levels who responded inadequately to the first trial with the SSRIs. METHODS: Patients with depression and low normal B12 levels were randomized to a control arm (antidepressant only) or treatment arm (antidepressants and injectable vitamin B12 supplementation). RESULTS: A total of 199 depressed patients were screened. Out of 73 patients with low normal B12 levels 34 (47%) were randomized to the treatment group while 39 (53%) were randomized to the control arm. At three months follow up 100% of the treatment group showed at least a 20% reduction in HAM-D score, while only 69% in the control arm showed at least a 20% reduction in HAM-D score (p<0.001). The findings remained significant after adjusting for baseline HAM-D score (p=0.001). CONCLUSION: Vitamin B12 supplementation with antidepressants significantly improved depressive symptoms in our cohort. SN - 1874-205X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24339839/full_citation L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/24339839/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -