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Effect of liquid meals with different volumes on gastroesophageal reflux disease.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM

Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are often advised to avoid large meals, based on their complaints of increased symptoms after eating too much, and epidemiological evidence of a link between high volume intake and the presence of GERD. However, the precise effects of meal volume on gastroesophageal reflux have not been well studied. We aimed to clarify the effect of meal volume on acid regurgitation and symptoms in patients with GERD.

METHODS

Fifteen patients (10 female, 5 male; mean 54 ± 10 years old) with GERD were studied twice each in random order, during 24 h ambulatory pH monitoring. On one day, they consumed a 600 mL liquid test meal three times (breakfast, lunch, and dinner), and on the other, they consumed a 300 mL test meal six times (breakfast, snack, lunch, snack, dinner, and snack). Gastric fundus and antral areas and antral contractions were measured by transabdominal ultrasound. Symptoms were recorded using questionnaires.

RESULTS

During the 600 mL regimen, there were more reflux episodes (17 ± 4 vs 10 ± 2, P = 0.03) and a greater total acid reflux time (12.5 ± 5.9% vs 5.5 ± 3.6%; P = 0.045) than the 300 mL regimen. Both the cross-sectional area of the gastric fundus (P = 0.024) and the number of antral contractions (P = 0.014) were greater for the 600 mL regimen.

CONCLUSIONS

Larger meals are associated with distension of the gastric fundus and an increase in gastroesophageal reflux when compared with smaller, more frequent meals.

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    MeSH

    Adult
    Disease Progression
    Eating
    Esophageal pH Monitoring
    Female
    Gastric Fundus
    Gastroesophageal Reflux
    Gastrointestinal Motility
    Humans
    Male
    Meals
    Middle Aged
    Pyloric Antrum
    Surveys and Questionnaires

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    24712047

    Citation

    Wu, Keng-Liang, et al. "Effect of Liquid Meals With Different Volumes On Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease." Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, vol. 29, no. 3, 2014, pp. 469-73.
    Wu KL, Rayner CK, Chuah SK, et al. Effect of liquid meals with different volumes on gastroesophageal reflux disease. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014;29(3):469-73.
    Wu, K. L., Rayner, C. K., Chuah, S. K., Chiu, Y. C., Chiu, K. W., Hu, T. H., & Chiu, C. T. (2014). Effect of liquid meals with different volumes on gastroesophageal reflux disease. Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 29(3), pp. 469-73.
    Wu KL, et al. Effect of Liquid Meals With Different Volumes On Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014;29(3):469-73. PubMed PMID: 24712047.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of liquid meals with different volumes on gastroesophageal reflux disease. AU - Wu,Keng-Liang, AU - Rayner,Christopher K, AU - Chuah,Seng-Kee, AU - Chiu,Yi-Chun, AU - Chiu,King-Wah, AU - Hu,Tsung-Hui, AU - Chiu,Cheng-Tang, PY - 2014/4/9/entrez PY - 2014/4/9/pubmed PY - 2014/11/2/medline SP - 469 EP - 73 JF - Journal of gastroenterology and hepatology JO - J. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. VL - 29 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIM: Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are often advised to avoid large meals, based on their complaints of increased symptoms after eating too much, and epidemiological evidence of a link between high volume intake and the presence of GERD. However, the precise effects of meal volume on gastroesophageal reflux have not been well studied. We aimed to clarify the effect of meal volume on acid regurgitation and symptoms in patients with GERD. METHODS: Fifteen patients (10 female, 5 male; mean 54 ± 10 years old) with GERD were studied twice each in random order, during 24 h ambulatory pH monitoring. On one day, they consumed a 600 mL liquid test meal three times (breakfast, lunch, and dinner), and on the other, they consumed a 300 mL test meal six times (breakfast, snack, lunch, snack, dinner, and snack). Gastric fundus and antral areas and antral contractions were measured by transabdominal ultrasound. Symptoms were recorded using questionnaires. RESULTS: During the 600 mL regimen, there were more reflux episodes (17 ± 4 vs 10 ± 2, P = 0.03) and a greater total acid reflux time (12.5 ± 5.9% vs 5.5 ± 3.6%; P = 0.045) than the 300 mL regimen. Both the cross-sectional area of the gastric fundus (P = 0.024) and the number of antral contractions (P = 0.014) were greater for the 600 mL regimen. CONCLUSIONS: Larger meals are associated with distension of the gastric fundus and an increase in gastroesophageal reflux when compared with smaller, more frequent meals. SN - 1440-1746 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24712047/full_citation L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=24712047.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -