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Adolescent dietary fiber, vegetable fat, vegetable protein, and nut intakes and breast cancer risk.

Abstract

The importance of early-life exposures in breast cancer development is increasingly recognized. However, limited research has evaluated the relationship between adolescent diet and subsequent risk of breast cancer and reported inconsistent results. This population-based case-control study investigated the associations of dietary fiber, vegetable protein, vegetable fat, and nuts consumed during adolescence with adult breast cancer risk. Women, ages 25-74 years, who were diagnosed with first primary breast cancer between 2002 and 2003, were identified using the Ontario Cancer Registry. Controls were identified through random-digit dialing and age-frequency matched to cases. Diet at ages 10-15 was assessed with a 55-item food frequency questionnaire among 2,865 cases and 3,299 controls. Logistic regression was performed to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Inverse associations were found between intakes of dietary fiber, vegetable protein, vegetable fat, and nuts during adolescence and breast cancer risk, which persisted after controlling for adult intakes. The ORs (95 % CI) for the highest versus the lowest quintile of intake were 0.66 (0.55-0.78; P trend < 0.0001) for fiber, 0.80 (0.68-0.95; P trend = 0.01) for vegetable protein, 0.74 (0.63-0.87; P trend = 0.002) for vegetable fat, and 0.76 (0.61-0.95 for ≥1 serving/day vs. <1 serving/month intake; P trend = 0.04) for nuts. The reduced risk for adolescent intakes of fiber, vegetable protein, and nuts was largely limited to postmenopausal women (P interaction ≤ 0.05). Dietary fiber, vegetable protein, vegetable fat, and nuts consumed during adolescence were associated with reduced breast cancer risk.

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    Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 S. Euclid Ave, Campus Box 8100, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA.

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    Source

    Breast cancer research and treatment 145:2 2014 Jun pg 461-70

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Aged
    Body Mass Index
    Breast Neoplasms
    Case-Control Studies
    Dietary Fats
    Dietary Fiber
    Feeding Behavior
    Female
    Humans
    Menopause
    Middle Aged
    Nuts
    Odds Ratio
    Ontario
    Plant Proteins, Dietary
    Risk Factors
    Vegetables

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    24737167

    Citation

    Liu, Ying, et al. "Adolescent Dietary Fiber, Vegetable Fat, Vegetable Protein, and Nut Intakes and Breast Cancer Risk." Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, vol. 145, no. 2, 2014, pp. 461-70.
    Liu Y, Colditz GA, Cotterchio M, et al. Adolescent dietary fiber, vegetable fat, vegetable protein, and nut intakes and breast cancer risk. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2014;145(2):461-70.
    Liu, Y., Colditz, G. A., Cotterchio, M., Boucher, B. A., & Kreiger, N. (2014). Adolescent dietary fiber, vegetable fat, vegetable protein, and nut intakes and breast cancer risk. Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 145(2), pp. 461-70. doi:10.1007/s10549-014-2953-3.
    Liu Y, et al. Adolescent Dietary Fiber, Vegetable Fat, Vegetable Protein, and Nut Intakes and Breast Cancer Risk. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2014;145(2):461-70. PubMed PMID: 24737167.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Adolescent dietary fiber, vegetable fat, vegetable protein, and nut intakes and breast cancer risk. AU - Liu,Ying, AU - Colditz,Graham A, AU - Cotterchio,Michelle, AU - Boucher,Beatrice A, AU - Kreiger,Nancy, Y1 - 2014/04/16/ PY - 2014/03/31/received PY - 2014/04/03/accepted PY - 2014/4/17/entrez PY - 2014/4/17/pubmed PY - 2015/11/13/medline SP - 461 EP - 70 JF - Breast cancer research and treatment JO - Breast Cancer Res. Treat. VL - 145 IS - 2 N2 - The importance of early-life exposures in breast cancer development is increasingly recognized. However, limited research has evaluated the relationship between adolescent diet and subsequent risk of breast cancer and reported inconsistent results. This population-based case-control study investigated the associations of dietary fiber, vegetable protein, vegetable fat, and nuts consumed during adolescence with adult breast cancer risk. Women, ages 25-74 years, who were diagnosed with first primary breast cancer between 2002 and 2003, were identified using the Ontario Cancer Registry. Controls were identified through random-digit dialing and age-frequency matched to cases. Diet at ages 10-15 was assessed with a 55-item food frequency questionnaire among 2,865 cases and 3,299 controls. Logistic regression was performed to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Inverse associations were found between intakes of dietary fiber, vegetable protein, vegetable fat, and nuts during adolescence and breast cancer risk, which persisted after controlling for adult intakes. The ORs (95 % CI) for the highest versus the lowest quintile of intake were 0.66 (0.55-0.78; P trend < 0.0001) for fiber, 0.80 (0.68-0.95; P trend = 0.01) for vegetable protein, 0.74 (0.63-0.87; P trend = 0.002) for vegetable fat, and 0.76 (0.61-0.95 for ≥1 serving/day vs. <1 serving/month intake; P trend = 0.04) for nuts. The reduced risk for adolescent intakes of fiber, vegetable protein, and nuts was largely limited to postmenopausal women (P interaction ≤ 0.05). Dietary fiber, vegetable protein, vegetable fat, and nuts consumed during adolescence were associated with reduced breast cancer risk. SN - 1573-7217 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24737167/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10549-014-2953-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -