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Jet lag.
BMJ Clin Evid. 2014 Apr 29; 2014BC

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Jet lag is a syndrome caused by disruption of the 'body clock', and affects most air travellers crossing five or more time zones; it is worse on eastward than on westward flights.

METHODS AND OUTCOMES

We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of interventions to prevent or minimise jet lag? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to January 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA).

RESULTS

We found five studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions.

CONCLUSIONS

In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: hypnotics, lifestyle and environmental adaptations, and melatonin.

Authors+Show Affiliations

UK Cochrane Centre, Oxford, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24780537

Citation

Herxheimer, Andrew. "Jet Lag." BMJ Clinical Evidence, vol. 2014, 2014.
Herxheimer A. Jet lag. BMJ Clin Evid. 2014;2014.
Herxheimer, A. (2014). Jet lag. BMJ Clinical Evidence, 2014.
Herxheimer A. Jet Lag. BMJ Clin Evid. 2014 Apr 29;2014 PubMed PMID: 24780537.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Jet lag. A1 - Herxheimer,Andrew, Y1 - 2014/04/29/ PY - 2014/5/1/entrez PY - 2014/5/2/pubmed PY - 2018/4/27/medline JF - BMJ clinical evidence JO - BMJ Clin Evid VL - 2014 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Jet lag is a syndrome caused by disruption of the 'body clock', and affects most air travellers crossing five or more time zones; it is worse on eastward than on westward flights. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of interventions to prevent or minimise jet lag? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to January 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). RESULTS: We found five studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. CONCLUSIONS: In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: hypnotics, lifestyle and environmental adaptations, and melatonin. SN - 1752-8526 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24780537/full_citation L2 - http://www.clinicalevidence.bmj.com/ceweb/pmc/2014/04/2303 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -