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Folate intake and breast cancer prognosis: a meta-analysis of prospective observational studies.
Eur J Cancer Prev 2015; 24(2):113-21EJ

Abstract

Some studies have investigated the association between folate intake and breast cancer prognosis, but the results have been far from conclusive. Thus, a meta-analysis was carried out to explore this association. We performed a comprehensive search of the PubMed, Web of Knowledge, and Cochrane databases from inception to May 2013. The summary hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using a random effects model. Prespecified stratified analyses, sensitivity analyses, and dose-response analysis were also carried out. Five studies, with a total of 7299 participants, were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled HR (95% CI) of the five studies on the association of dietary folate intake (highest vs. lowest) with all-cause mortality was 0.74 (0.60-0.92). Stratified analyses suggested that the inverse association of dietary folate and all-cause mortality was more easily detected in studies that focused on prediagnosis diets, included more patients (>1000), had longer follow-up periods (>7 years), used structured interviews, or had more categories of folate intake (>3). However, none of these differences was statistically significant. No significant association was found between total (dietary and supplementary) folate intake and all-cause mortality, or dietary folate intake and breast cancer-specific mortality, with pooled HRs (95% CI) of 0.93 (0.75-1.15) and 0.79 (0.61-1.01), respectively. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of the findings by excluding studies that poorly represented the cohort. Our findings suggest a significant inverse association between dietary folate intake and all-cause mortality, but not between total folate intake and all-cause mortality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24787380

Citation

Li, Bin, et al. "Folate Intake and Breast Cancer Prognosis: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Observational Studies." European Journal of Cancer Prevention : the Official Journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP), vol. 24, no. 2, 2015, pp. 113-21.
Li B, Lu Y, Wang L, et al. Folate intake and breast cancer prognosis: a meta-analysis of prospective observational studies. Eur J Cancer Prev. 2015;24(2):113-21.
Li, B., Lu, Y., Wang, L., & Zhang, C. X. (2015). Folate intake and breast cancer prognosis: a meta-analysis of prospective observational studies. European Journal of Cancer Prevention : the Official Journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP), 24(2), pp. 113-21. doi:10.1097/CEJ.0000000000000028.
Li B, et al. Folate Intake and Breast Cancer Prognosis: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Observational Studies. Eur J Cancer Prev. 2015;24(2):113-21. PubMed PMID: 24787380.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Folate intake and breast cancer prognosis: a meta-analysis of prospective observational studies. AU - Li,Bin, AU - Lu,Ying, AU - Wang,Lian, AU - Zhang,Cai-Xia, PY - 2014/5/3/entrez PY - 2014/5/3/pubmed PY - 2015/11/13/medline SP - 113 EP - 21 JF - European journal of cancer prevention : the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP) JO - Eur. J. Cancer Prev. VL - 24 IS - 2 N2 - Some studies have investigated the association between folate intake and breast cancer prognosis, but the results have been far from conclusive. Thus, a meta-analysis was carried out to explore this association. We performed a comprehensive search of the PubMed, Web of Knowledge, and Cochrane databases from inception to May 2013. The summary hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using a random effects model. Prespecified stratified analyses, sensitivity analyses, and dose-response analysis were also carried out. Five studies, with a total of 7299 participants, were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled HR (95% CI) of the five studies on the association of dietary folate intake (highest vs. lowest) with all-cause mortality was 0.74 (0.60-0.92). Stratified analyses suggested that the inverse association of dietary folate and all-cause mortality was more easily detected in studies that focused on prediagnosis diets, included more patients (>1000), had longer follow-up periods (>7 years), used structured interviews, or had more categories of folate intake (>3). However, none of these differences was statistically significant. No significant association was found between total (dietary and supplementary) folate intake and all-cause mortality, or dietary folate intake and breast cancer-specific mortality, with pooled HRs (95% CI) of 0.93 (0.75-1.15) and 0.79 (0.61-1.01), respectively. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of the findings by excluding studies that poorly represented the cohort. Our findings suggest a significant inverse association between dietary folate intake and all-cause mortality, but not between total folate intake and all-cause mortality. SN - 1473-5709 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24787380/full_citation L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=24787380 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -