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Low-grade dietary-related inflammation and survival after colorectal cancer surgery.

Abstract

PURPOSE

Prolong inflammation is a central process observed in several chronic conditions and may be responsible for survival. There is an increasing evidence showing the role of diet in inflammation and habitual diet may be responsible for low-grade inflammation. The purpose of our study was to assess the effect of inflammatory properties of habitual diet measured by the Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) on survival among surgical patients treated for colorectal cancer (CRC).

METHODS

A follow-up study among 689 CRC patients (mean age 58 years, ±8.9; 56.7 % males) treated surgically was performed in Krakow, Poland. Habitual diet was assessed by a standardized semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Next, 23 dietary items were used to calculate DIIs. Vital records were verified to determine status of the participants.

RESULTS

Study has shown linear association between DII and survival time among CRC patients with totally removed cancer treated by chemotherapy (b = -0.13, p = 0.024). After adjustment for several important covariates, DII was associated with survival during up to 3 years after surgery, but only in patients without distant metastases (3-year HRDII>-2.27 = 0.61, 95 % CI 0.38-0.99).

CONCLUSIONS

The results of the investigation have shown the usefulness of the DII as a potential predictor of survival among patients without distant metastases treated surgically for CRC.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology, Chair of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Jagiellonian University Medical College, 7a Kopernika St, 31-034, Kraków, Poland, mygalas@cyf-kr.edu.pl.

    Source

    MeSH

    Aged
    Colorectal Neoplasms
    Diet
    Feeding Behavior
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Humans
    Inflammation
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Prognosis
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    24863751

    Citation

    Galas, Aleksander, and Jan Kulig. "Low-grade Dietary-related Inflammation and Survival After Colorectal Cancer Surgery." Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, vol. 140, no. 9, 2014, pp. 1517-25.
    Galas A, Kulig J. Low-grade dietary-related inflammation and survival after colorectal cancer surgery. J Cancer Res Clin Oncol. 2014;140(9):1517-25.
    Galas, A., & Kulig, J. (2014). Low-grade dietary-related inflammation and survival after colorectal cancer surgery. Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, 140(9), pp. 1517-25. doi:10.1007/s00432-014-1711-6.
    Galas A, Kulig J. Low-grade Dietary-related Inflammation and Survival After Colorectal Cancer Surgery. J Cancer Res Clin Oncol. 2014;140(9):1517-25. PubMed PMID: 24863751.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Low-grade dietary-related inflammation and survival after colorectal cancer surgery. AU - Galas,Aleksander, AU - Kulig,Jan, Y1 - 2014/05/27/ PY - 2014/04/08/received PY - 2014/05/11/accepted PY - 2014/5/28/entrez PY - 2014/5/28/pubmed PY - 2014/11/5/medline SP - 1517 EP - 25 JF - Journal of cancer research and clinical oncology JO - J. Cancer Res. Clin. Oncol. VL - 140 IS - 9 N2 - PURPOSE: Prolong inflammation is a central process observed in several chronic conditions and may be responsible for survival. There is an increasing evidence showing the role of diet in inflammation and habitual diet may be responsible for low-grade inflammation. The purpose of our study was to assess the effect of inflammatory properties of habitual diet measured by the Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) on survival among surgical patients treated for colorectal cancer (CRC). METHODS: A follow-up study among 689 CRC patients (mean age 58 years, ±8.9; 56.7 % males) treated surgically was performed in Krakow, Poland. Habitual diet was assessed by a standardized semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Next, 23 dietary items were used to calculate DIIs. Vital records were verified to determine status of the participants. RESULTS: Study has shown linear association between DII and survival time among CRC patients with totally removed cancer treated by chemotherapy (b = -0.13, p = 0.024). After adjustment for several important covariates, DII was associated with survival during up to 3 years after surgery, but only in patients without distant metastases (3-year HRDII>-2.27 = 0.61, 95 % CI 0.38-0.99). CONCLUSIONS: The results of the investigation have shown the usefulness of the DII as a potential predictor of survival among patients without distant metastases treated surgically for CRC. SN - 1432-1335 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24863751/full_citation L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00432-014-1711-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -