Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Veganism Is a Viable Alternative to Conventional Diet Therapy for Improving Blood Lipids and Glycemic Control.

Abstract

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) have each outlined a set of dietary recommendations aimed at improving glycemic control and blood lipids, respectively. However, traditional vegan diets (low-fat diets that proscribe animal product consumption) are also effective at improving glycemic control, and dietary portfolios (vegan diets that contain prescribed amounts of plant sterols, viscous fibers, soy protein, and nuts) are also effective at improving blood lipids. The purpose of this review was to compare the effects of traditional vegan diets and dietary portfolios with ADA and NCEP diets on body weight, blood lipids, blood pressure, and glycemic control. The main findings are that traditional vegan diets appear to improve glycemic control better than ADA diets in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), while dietary portfolios have been consistently shown to improve blood lipids better than NCEP diets in hypercholesterolemic individuals.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    a Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition , University of Illinois at Chicago , Chicago , Illinois , USA.

    Source

    MeSH

    Blood Glucose
    Blood Pressure
    Body Weight
    Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
    Diet, Vegan
    Humans
    Hyperglycemia
    Hyperlipidemias
    Lipids

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    24922183

    Citation

    Trepanowski, John F., and Krista A. Varady. "Veganism Is a Viable Alternative to Conventional Diet Therapy for Improving Blood Lipids and Glycemic Control." Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, vol. 55, no. 14, 2015, pp. 2004-13.
    Trepanowski JF, Varady KA. Veganism Is a Viable Alternative to Conventional Diet Therapy for Improving Blood Lipids and Glycemic Control. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2015;55(14):2004-13.
    Trepanowski, J. F., & Varady, K. A. (2015). Veganism Is a Viable Alternative to Conventional Diet Therapy for Improving Blood Lipids and Glycemic Control. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 55(14), pp. 2004-13. doi:10.1080/10408398.2012.736093.
    Trepanowski JF, Varady KA. Veganism Is a Viable Alternative to Conventional Diet Therapy for Improving Blood Lipids and Glycemic Control. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2015;55(14):2004-13. PubMed PMID: 24922183.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Veganism Is a Viable Alternative to Conventional Diet Therapy for Improving Blood Lipids and Glycemic Control. AU - Trepanowski,John F, AU - Varady,Krista A, PY - 2014/6/13/entrez PY - 2014/6/13/pubmed PY - 2016/3/8/medline KW - Cardiovascular disease KW - blood pressure KW - body weight KW - type 2 diabetes SP - 2004 EP - 13 JF - Critical reviews in food science and nutrition JO - Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr VL - 55 IS - 14 N2 - The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) have each outlined a set of dietary recommendations aimed at improving glycemic control and blood lipids, respectively. However, traditional vegan diets (low-fat diets that proscribe animal product consumption) are also effective at improving glycemic control, and dietary portfolios (vegan diets that contain prescribed amounts of plant sterols, viscous fibers, soy protein, and nuts) are also effective at improving blood lipids. The purpose of this review was to compare the effects of traditional vegan diets and dietary portfolios with ADA and NCEP diets on body weight, blood lipids, blood pressure, and glycemic control. The main findings are that traditional vegan diets appear to improve glycemic control better than ADA diets in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), while dietary portfolios have been consistently shown to improve blood lipids better than NCEP diets in hypercholesterolemic individuals. SN - 1549-7852 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24922183/full_citation L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10408398.2012.736093 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -