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Dietary fat composition and dementia risk.
Neurobiol Aging 2014; 35 Suppl 2:S59-64NA

Abstract

This is a qualitative review of the evidence linking dietary fat composition to the risk of developing dementia. The review considers laboratory and animal studies that identify underlying mechanisms as well as prospective epidemiologic studies linking biochemical or dietary fatty acids to cognitive decline or incident dementia. Several lines of evidence provide support for the hypothesis that high saturated or trans fatty acids increase the risk of dementia and high polyunsaturated or monounsaturated fatty acids decrease risk. Dietary fat composition is an important factor in blood-brain barrier function and the blood cholesterol profile. Cholesterol and blood-brain barrier function are involved in the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease, and the primary genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, apolipoprotein E-ε4, is involved in cholesterol transport. The epidemiologic literature is seemingly inconsistent on this topic, but many studies are difficult to interpret because of analytical techniques that ignored negative confounding by other fatty acids, which likely resulted in null findings. The studies that appropriately adjust for confounding by other fats support the dietary fat composition hypothesis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Section of Nutrition and Nutritional Epidemiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA. Electronic address: Martha_Morris@rush.edu.Department of Clinical Nutrition, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24970568

Citation

Morris, Martha Clare, and Christine C. Tangney. "Dietary Fat Composition and Dementia Risk." Neurobiology of Aging, vol. 35 Suppl 2, 2014, pp. S59-64.
Morris MC, Tangney CC. Dietary fat composition and dementia risk. Neurobiol Aging. 2014;35 Suppl 2:S59-64.
Morris, M. C., & Tangney, C. C. (2014). Dietary fat composition and dementia risk. Neurobiology of Aging, 35 Suppl 2, pp. S59-64. doi:10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2014.03.038.
Morris MC, Tangney CC. Dietary Fat Composition and Dementia Risk. Neurobiol Aging. 2014;35 Suppl 2:S59-64. PubMed PMID: 24970568.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary fat composition and dementia risk. AU - Morris,Martha Clare, AU - Tangney,Christine C, Y1 - 2014/05/15/ PY - 2013/11/06/received PY - 2014/02/27/revised PY - 2014/03/15/accepted PY - 2014/6/28/entrez PY - 2014/6/28/pubmed PY - 2015/1/21/medline KW - Alzheimer's disease KW - Cognitive decline KW - Dementia KW - Diet KW - Fatty acids KW - Monounsaturated fats KW - Polyunsaturated fats KW - Saturated fats KW - Trans fats SP - S59 EP - 64 JF - Neurobiology of aging JO - Neurobiol. Aging VL - 35 Suppl 2 N2 - This is a qualitative review of the evidence linking dietary fat composition to the risk of developing dementia. The review considers laboratory and animal studies that identify underlying mechanisms as well as prospective epidemiologic studies linking biochemical or dietary fatty acids to cognitive decline or incident dementia. Several lines of evidence provide support for the hypothesis that high saturated or trans fatty acids increase the risk of dementia and high polyunsaturated or monounsaturated fatty acids decrease risk. Dietary fat composition is an important factor in blood-brain barrier function and the blood cholesterol profile. Cholesterol and blood-brain barrier function are involved in the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease, and the primary genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, apolipoprotein E-ε4, is involved in cholesterol transport. The epidemiologic literature is seemingly inconsistent on this topic, but many studies are difficult to interpret because of analytical techniques that ignored negative confounding by other fatty acids, which likely resulted in null findings. The studies that appropriately adjust for confounding by other fats support the dietary fat composition hypothesis. SN - 1558-1497 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24970568/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0197-4580(14)00354-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -