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Egg consumption is associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer: Evidence from a meta-analysis of observational studies.
Clin Nutr 2015; 34(4):635-41CN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The findings of epidemiologic studies on the association between egg consumption and ovarian cancer risk remain conflicting. The aim of this meta-analysis was to investigate whether an association exists between egg intake and ovarian cancer risk in epidemiologic studies.

METHODS

A literature search was carried out using PUBMED, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library Central database for all medical literature published in English-language journals up to August 2013. Before meta-analysis, between-study heterogeneity and publication bias were assessed using adequate statistical tests. Fixed-effect and random-effect models were used to estimate summary relative risks (RR) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Subgroup analyses and sensitivity analysis were also performed.

RESULTS

A total of 12 eligible studies (six case-control studies and six cohort studies) were included, involving 629,453 subjects and 3728 ovarian cancer cases. We found that high egg intake (comparing the highest with the lowest category) was associated with a significant increased risk of ovarian cancer (RR = 1.21, 95% CI [1.06, 1.38]). When we examined whether the associations differed by study type, statistically significant effect of egg intake on ovarian cancer was observed among case-control studies (RR = 1.22, 95% CI [1.03, 1.43]), but not among cohort studies (RR = 1.20, 95% CI [0.97, 1.48]).

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings suggest that egg consumption may increase ovarian cancer risk. Additional studies, especially large prospective cohort studies, are warranted to confirm the findings.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gynaecology, Cangzhou Central Hospital, Hebei Medical University, Cangzhou 061001, China.Department of Gynaecology, Cangzhou Central Hospital, Hebei Medical University, Cangzhou 061001, China. Electronic address: dr_liangguo@126.com.Department of Gynaecology, Cangzhou Central Hospital, Hebei Medical University, Cangzhou 061001, China.Department of Gynaecology, Cangzhou Central Hospital, Hebei Medical University, Cangzhou 061001, China.Department of Gynaecology, Cangzhou Central Hospital, Hebei Medical University, Cangzhou 061001, China.Department of Gynaecology, Cangzhou Central Hospital, Hebei Medical University, Cangzhou 061001, China.Department of Gynaecology, Cangzhou Central Hospital, Hebei Medical University, Cangzhou 061001, China.Department of Gynaecology, Cangzhou Central Hospital, Hebei Medical University, Cangzhou 061001, China.Department of Gynaecology, Cangzhou Central Hospital, Hebei Medical University, Cangzhou 061001, China.Department of Gynaecology, Cangzhou Central Hospital, Hebei Medical University, Cangzhou 061001, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25108572

Citation

Zeng, Sai-tian, et al. "Egg Consumption Is Associated With Increased Risk of Ovarian Cancer: Evidence From a Meta-analysis of Observational Studies." Clinical Nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland), vol. 34, no. 4, 2015, pp. 635-41.
Zeng ST, Guo L, Liu SK, et al. Egg consumption is associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer: Evidence from a meta-analysis of observational studies. Clin Nutr. 2015;34(4):635-41.
Zeng, S. T., Guo, L., Liu, S. K., Wang, D. H., Xi, J., Huang, P., ... Zhang, L. (2015). Egg consumption is associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer: Evidence from a meta-analysis of observational studies. Clinical Nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland), 34(4), pp. 635-41. doi:10.1016/j.clnu.2014.07.009.
Zeng ST, et al. Egg Consumption Is Associated With Increased Risk of Ovarian Cancer: Evidence From a Meta-analysis of Observational Studies. Clin Nutr. 2015;34(4):635-41. PubMed PMID: 25108572.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Egg consumption is associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer: Evidence from a meta-analysis of observational studies. AU - Zeng,Sai-tian, AU - Guo,Liang, AU - Liu,Shi-kai, AU - Wang,Dong-hui, AU - Xi,Jie, AU - Huang,Ping, AU - Liu,Dan-tong, AU - Gao,Jie-Fan, AU - Feng,Jing, AU - Zhang,Liang, Y1 - 2014/07/23/ PY - 2014/03/14/received PY - 2014/07/15/revised PY - 2014/07/18/accepted PY - 2014/8/11/entrez PY - 2014/8/12/pubmed PY - 2016/3/26/medline KW - Dietary KW - Egg KW - Epidemiology KW - Meta-analysis KW - Ovarian cancer SP - 635 EP - 41 JF - Clinical nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland) JO - Clin Nutr VL - 34 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: The findings of epidemiologic studies on the association between egg consumption and ovarian cancer risk remain conflicting. The aim of this meta-analysis was to investigate whether an association exists between egg intake and ovarian cancer risk in epidemiologic studies. METHODS: A literature search was carried out using PUBMED, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library Central database for all medical literature published in English-language journals up to August 2013. Before meta-analysis, between-study heterogeneity and publication bias were assessed using adequate statistical tests. Fixed-effect and random-effect models were used to estimate summary relative risks (RR) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Subgroup analyses and sensitivity analysis were also performed. RESULTS: A total of 12 eligible studies (six case-control studies and six cohort studies) were included, involving 629,453 subjects and 3728 ovarian cancer cases. We found that high egg intake (comparing the highest with the lowest category) was associated with a significant increased risk of ovarian cancer (RR = 1.21, 95% CI [1.06, 1.38]). When we examined whether the associations differed by study type, statistically significant effect of egg intake on ovarian cancer was observed among case-control studies (RR = 1.22, 95% CI [1.03, 1.43]), but not among cohort studies (RR = 1.20, 95% CI [0.97, 1.48]). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that egg consumption may increase ovarian cancer risk. Additional studies, especially large prospective cohort studies, are warranted to confirm the findings. SN - 1532-1983 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25108572/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0261-5614(14)00185-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -