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Association between vitamin C intake and lung cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis.

Abstract

Epidemiological studies evaluating the association between the intake of vitamin C and lung cancer risk have produced inconsistent results. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the association between them. Pertinent studies were identified by a search of PubMed, Web of Knowledge and Wan Fang Med Online through December of 2013. Random-effect model was used to combine the data for analysis. Publication bias was estimated using Begg's funnel plot and Egger's regression asymmetry test. Eighteen articles reporting 21 studies involving 8938 lung cancer cases were included in this meta-analysis. Pooled results suggested that highest vitamin C intake level versus lowest level was significantly associated with the risk of lung cancer [summary relative risk (RR) = 0.829, 95%CI = 0.734-0.937, I(2) = 57.8%], especially in the United States and in prospective studies. A linear dose-response relationship was found, with the risk of lung cancer decreasing by 7% for every 100 mg/day increase in the intake of vitamin C [summary RR = 0.93, 95%CI = 0.88-0.98]. No publication bias was found. Our analysis suggested that the higher intake of vitamin C might have a protective effect against lung cancer, especially in the United States, although this conclusion needs to be confirmed.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    1] Department of Medical Oncology, Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, 507 Zhengmin Road, 200433 Shanghai, China [2].

    ,

    1] Department of Medical Oncology, Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, 507 Zhengmin Road, 200433 Shanghai, China [2].

    Department of Medical Oncology, Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, 507 Zhengmin Road, 200433 Shanghai, China.

    Source

    Scientific reports 4: 2014 Aug 22 pg 6161

    MeSH

    Ascorbic Acid
    Dietary Supplements
    Humans
    Lung Neoplasms
    Odds Ratio
    Publication Bias
    Risk

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Meta-Analysis

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    25145261

    Citation

    Luo, Jie, et al. "Association Between Vitamin C Intake and Lung Cancer: a Dose-response Meta-analysis." Scientific Reports, vol. 4, 2014, p. 6161.
    Luo J, Shen L, Zheng D. Association between vitamin C intake and lung cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis. Sci Rep. 2014;4:6161.
    Luo, J., Shen, L., & Zheng, D. (2014). Association between vitamin C intake and lung cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis. Scientific Reports, 4, p. 6161. doi:10.1038/srep06161.
    Luo J, Shen L, Zheng D. Association Between Vitamin C Intake and Lung Cancer: a Dose-response Meta-analysis. Sci Rep. 2014 Aug 22;4:6161. PubMed PMID: 25145261.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Association between vitamin C intake and lung cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis. AU - Luo,Jie, AU - Shen,Li, AU - Zheng,Di, Y1 - 2014/08/22/ PY - 2014/04/23/received PY - 2014/07/25/accepted PY - 2014/8/23/entrez PY - 2014/8/26/pubmed PY - 2015/10/27/medline SP - 6161 EP - 6161 JF - Scientific reports JO - Sci Rep VL - 4 N2 - Epidemiological studies evaluating the association between the intake of vitamin C and lung cancer risk have produced inconsistent results. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the association between them. Pertinent studies were identified by a search of PubMed, Web of Knowledge and Wan Fang Med Online through December of 2013. Random-effect model was used to combine the data for analysis. Publication bias was estimated using Begg's funnel plot and Egger's regression asymmetry test. Eighteen articles reporting 21 studies involving 8938 lung cancer cases were included in this meta-analysis. Pooled results suggested that highest vitamin C intake level versus lowest level was significantly associated with the risk of lung cancer [summary relative risk (RR) = 0.829, 95%CI = 0.734-0.937, I(2) = 57.8%], especially in the United States and in prospective studies. A linear dose-response relationship was found, with the risk of lung cancer decreasing by 7% for every 100 mg/day increase in the intake of vitamin C [summary RR = 0.93, 95%CI = 0.88-0.98]. No publication bias was found. Our analysis suggested that the higher intake of vitamin C might have a protective effect against lung cancer, especially in the United States, although this conclusion needs to be confirmed. SN - 2045-2322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25145261/full_citation L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep06161 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -