Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Tea consumption and risk of cardiovascular outcomes and total mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective observational studies.
Eur J Epidemiol 2015; 30(2):103-13EJ

Abstract

Studies that investigated the association between tea consumption and the risk of major cardiovascular events have reported inconsistent results. We conducted a meta-analysis of prospective observational studies in order to summarize the evidence regarding the association between tea consumption and major cardiovascular outcomes or total mortality. In July 2014, we performed electronic searches in PubMed, EmBase, and the Cochrane Library, followed by manual searches of reference lists from the resulting articles to identify other relevant studies. Prospective observational studies that reported effect estimates, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), for coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, cardiac death, stroke death, or total mortality for more than two dosages of tea consumption were included. A random-effects meta-analysis was performed to determine the risk of major cardiovascular outcomes associated with an increase in tea consumption by 3 cups per day. Of the 736 citations identified from database searches, we included 22 prospective studies from 24 articles reporting data on 856,206 individuals, and including 8,459 cases of CHD, 10,572 of stroke, 5,798 cardiac deaths, 2,350 stroke deaths, and 13,722 total deaths. Overall, an increase in tea consumption by 3 cups per day was associated with a reduced risk of CHD (relative risk [RR], 0.73; 95% CI: 0.53-0.99; P = 0.045), cardiac death (RR, 0.74; 95% CI: 0.63-0.86; P < 0.001), stroke (RR, 0.82; 95% CI: 0.73-0.92; P = 0.001), total mortality (RR, 0.76; 95% CI: 0.63-0.91; P = 0.003), cerebral infarction (RR, 0.84; 95% CI: 0.72-0.98; P = 0.023), and intracerebral hemorrhage (RR, 0.79; 95% CI: 0.72-0.87; P < 0.001), but had little or no effect on stroke mortality (RR, 0.93; 95% CI: 0.83-1.05; P = 0.260). The findings from this meta-analysis indicate that increased tea consumption is associated with a reduced risk of CHD, cardiac death, stroke, cerebral infarction, and intracerebral hemorrhage, as well as total mortality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurosurgery, Shanghai Seventh People's Hospital, Shanghai, 200137, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25354990

Citation

Zhang, Chi, et al. "Tea Consumption and Risk of Cardiovascular Outcomes and Total Mortality: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Prospective Observational Studies." European Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 30, no. 2, 2015, pp. 103-13.
Zhang C, Qin YY, Wei X, et al. Tea consumption and risk of cardiovascular outcomes and total mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective observational studies. Eur J Epidemiol. 2015;30(2):103-13.
Zhang, C., Qin, Y. Y., Wei, X., Yu, F. F., Zhou, Y. H., & He, J. (2015). Tea consumption and risk of cardiovascular outcomes and total mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective observational studies. European Journal of Epidemiology, 30(2), pp. 103-13. doi:10.1007/s10654-014-9960-x.
Zhang C, et al. Tea Consumption and Risk of Cardiovascular Outcomes and Total Mortality: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Prospective Observational Studies. Eur J Epidemiol. 2015;30(2):103-13. PubMed PMID: 25354990.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Tea consumption and risk of cardiovascular outcomes and total mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective observational studies. AU - Zhang,Chi, AU - Qin,Ying-Yi, AU - Wei,Xin, AU - Yu,Fei-Fei, AU - Zhou,Yu-Hao, AU - He,Jia, Y1 - 2014/10/30/ PY - 2014/05/05/received PY - 2014/10/15/accepted PY - 2014/10/31/entrez PY - 2014/10/31/pubmed PY - 2015/6/9/medline SP - 103 EP - 13 JF - European journal of epidemiology JO - Eur. J. Epidemiol. VL - 30 IS - 2 N2 - Studies that investigated the association between tea consumption and the risk of major cardiovascular events have reported inconsistent results. We conducted a meta-analysis of prospective observational studies in order to summarize the evidence regarding the association between tea consumption and major cardiovascular outcomes or total mortality. In July 2014, we performed electronic searches in PubMed, EmBase, and the Cochrane Library, followed by manual searches of reference lists from the resulting articles to identify other relevant studies. Prospective observational studies that reported effect estimates, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), for coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, cardiac death, stroke death, or total mortality for more than two dosages of tea consumption were included. A random-effects meta-analysis was performed to determine the risk of major cardiovascular outcomes associated with an increase in tea consumption by 3 cups per day. Of the 736 citations identified from database searches, we included 22 prospective studies from 24 articles reporting data on 856,206 individuals, and including 8,459 cases of CHD, 10,572 of stroke, 5,798 cardiac deaths, 2,350 stroke deaths, and 13,722 total deaths. Overall, an increase in tea consumption by 3 cups per day was associated with a reduced risk of CHD (relative risk [RR], 0.73; 95% CI: 0.53-0.99; P = 0.045), cardiac death (RR, 0.74; 95% CI: 0.63-0.86; P < 0.001), stroke (RR, 0.82; 95% CI: 0.73-0.92; P = 0.001), total mortality (RR, 0.76; 95% CI: 0.63-0.91; P = 0.003), cerebral infarction (RR, 0.84; 95% CI: 0.72-0.98; P = 0.023), and intracerebral hemorrhage (RR, 0.79; 95% CI: 0.72-0.87; P < 0.001), but had little or no effect on stroke mortality (RR, 0.93; 95% CI: 0.83-1.05; P = 0.260). The findings from this meta-analysis indicate that increased tea consumption is associated with a reduced risk of CHD, cardiac death, stroke, cerebral infarction, and intracerebral hemorrhage, as well as total mortality. SN - 1573-7284 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25354990/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10654-014-9960-x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -