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Surgical treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in severely obese patients.

Abstract

Obesity is a multi-organ system disease with underlying metabolic abnormalities and chronic systemic inflammation. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a hepatic manifestation of obesity metabolic dysfunction and its associated cardiovascular- and liver-related morbidities and mortality. Our current understanding of NAFLD pathogenesis, disease characteristics, the role of insulin resistance, chronic inflammation, gut-liver and gut-brain crosstalk and the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy is still evolving. Bariatric surgery significantly improves metabolic and NAFLD histology in severely obese patients, although its positive effects on fibrosis are not universal. Bariatric surgery benefits NAFLD through its metabolic effect on insulin resistance, inflammation, and insulinotropic and anorexinogenic gastrointestinal hormones. Further studies are needed to understand the natural course of NAFLD in severely obese patients and the role of weight loss surgery as a primary treatment for NAFLD.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Children's Hospital of Illinois, Department of Surgery/Pediatric Surgery, Peoria, IL, USA.

    ,

    University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Children's Hospital of Illinois, Department of Surgery/Pediatric Surgery, Peoria, IL, USA.

    University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Children's Hospital of Illinois, Department of Surgery/Pediatric Surgery, Peoria, IL, USA.

    Source

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    25378958

    Citation

    Vander Naalt, Steven J., et al. "Surgical Treatment of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Severely Obese Patients." Hepatic Medicine : Evidence and Research, vol. 6, 2014, pp. 103-12.
    Vander Naalt SJ, Gurria JP, Holterman AL. Surgical treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in severely obese patients. Hepat Med. 2014;6:103-12.
    Vander Naalt, S. J., Gurria, J. P., & Holterman, A. L. (2014). Surgical treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in severely obese patients. Hepatic Medicine : Evidence and Research, 6, pp. 103-12. doi:10.2147/HMER.S64819.
    Vander Naalt SJ, Gurria JP, Holterman AL. Surgical Treatment of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Severely Obese Patients. Hepat Med. 2014;6:103-12. PubMed PMID: 25378958.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Surgical treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in severely obese patients. AU - Vander Naalt,Steven J, AU - Gurria,Juan P, AU - Holterman,AiXuan L, Y1 - 2014/10/29/ PY - 2014/11/8/entrez PY - 2014/11/8/pubmed PY - 2014/11/8/medline KW - NAFLD KW - bariatric surgery KW - severe obesity SP - 103 EP - 12 JF - Hepatic medicine : evidence and research JO - Hepat Med VL - 6 N2 - Obesity is a multi-organ system disease with underlying metabolic abnormalities and chronic systemic inflammation. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a hepatic manifestation of obesity metabolic dysfunction and its associated cardiovascular- and liver-related morbidities and mortality. Our current understanding of NAFLD pathogenesis, disease characteristics, the role of insulin resistance, chronic inflammation, gut-liver and gut-brain crosstalk and the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy is still evolving. Bariatric surgery significantly improves metabolic and NAFLD histology in severely obese patients, although its positive effects on fibrosis are not universal. Bariatric surgery benefits NAFLD through its metabolic effect on insulin resistance, inflammation, and insulinotropic and anorexinogenic gastrointestinal hormones. Further studies are needed to understand the natural course of NAFLD in severely obese patients and the role of weight loss surgery as a primary treatment for NAFLD. SN - 1179-1535 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25378958/full_citation L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.2147/HMER.S64819 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -