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Enhancing the role of nutrition professionals in weight management: A cross-sectional survey.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

(1) To determine the nonphysician health profession perceived as best qualified to provide weight management. (2) To examine nutrition professionals' current practice characteristics and perceived challenges and solutions for obesity care. (3) To examine the association between nutrition professionals' quality of training and self-efficacy in weight management.

METHODS

A 2014 national cross-sectional online survey of 500 U.S. nonphysician health professionals (100 from each: nutrition, nursing, behavioral/mental health, exercise, pharmacy) was analyzed.

RESULTS

Nutrition professionals most commonly self-identified as the most qualified group to help patients lose weight (92%), sentiments supported by other health professionals (57%). The most often cited challenge was lack of patient adherence (87%). Among nutrition professionals, 77% reported receiving high-quality training in weight loss counseling. Nutrition professionals who reported high-quality training were significantly more likely to report confidence (95% vs. 48%) and success (74 vs. 50%) in helping obese patients lose weight (P<0.05) than those reporting lower-quality training.

CONCLUSIONS

Across all nonphysician health professionals, nutrition professionals were identified as best suited to provide routine weight management counseling to obese patients. Yet nutrition professionals' receipt of high-quality weight management training appears critical to their success in helping patients lose weight.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

    , , ,

    Source

    Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) 23:2 2015 Feb pg 454-60

    MeSH

    Adult
    Body Weight
    Counseling
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Disease Management
    Female
    Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
    Health Personnel
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Morbidity
    Nutritional Status
    Obesity
    United States
    Weight Loss

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    25445319

    Citation

    Bleich, Sara N., et al. "Enhancing the Role of Nutrition Professionals in Weight Management: a Cross-sectional Survey." Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), vol. 23, no. 2, 2015, pp. 454-60.
    Bleich SN, Bandara S, Bennett W, et al. Enhancing the role of nutrition professionals in weight management: A cross-sectional survey. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2015;23(2):454-60.
    Bleich, S. N., Bandara, S., Bennett, W., Cooper, L. A., & Gudzune, K. A. (2015). Enhancing the role of nutrition professionals in weight management: A cross-sectional survey. Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), 23(2), pp. 454-60. doi:10.1002/oby.20945.
    Bleich SN, et al. Enhancing the Role of Nutrition Professionals in Weight Management: a Cross-sectional Survey. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2015;23(2):454-60. PubMed PMID: 25445319.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Enhancing the role of nutrition professionals in weight management: A cross-sectional survey. AU - Bleich,Sara N, AU - Bandara,Sachini, AU - Bennett,Wendy, AU - Cooper,Lisa A, AU - Gudzune,Kimberly A, Y1 - 2014/11/29/ PY - 2014/08/12/received PY - 2014/09/30/accepted PY - 2014/12/3/entrez PY - 2014/12/3/pubmed PY - 2015/7/22/medline SP - 454 EP - 60 JF - Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) JO - Obesity (Silver Spring) VL - 23 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: (1) To determine the nonphysician health profession perceived as best qualified to provide weight management. (2) To examine nutrition professionals' current practice characteristics and perceived challenges and solutions for obesity care. (3) To examine the association between nutrition professionals' quality of training and self-efficacy in weight management. METHODS: A 2014 national cross-sectional online survey of 500 U.S. nonphysician health professionals (100 from each: nutrition, nursing, behavioral/mental health, exercise, pharmacy) was analyzed. RESULTS: Nutrition professionals most commonly self-identified as the most qualified group to help patients lose weight (92%), sentiments supported by other health professionals (57%). The most often cited challenge was lack of patient adherence (87%). Among nutrition professionals, 77% reported receiving high-quality training in weight loss counseling. Nutrition professionals who reported high-quality training were significantly more likely to report confidence (95% vs. 48%) and success (74 vs. 50%) in helping obese patients lose weight (P<0.05) than those reporting lower-quality training. CONCLUSIONS: Across all nonphysician health professionals, nutrition professionals were identified as best suited to provide routine weight management counseling to obese patients. Yet nutrition professionals' receipt of high-quality weight management training appears critical to their success in helping patients lose weight. SN - 1930-739X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25445319/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/oby.20945 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -