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Vitamin intake reduce the risk of gastric cancer: meta-analysis and systematic review of randomized and observational studies.
PLoS One 2014; 9(12):e116060Plos

Abstract

AIM

The association between vitamin intake and gastric cancer (GC) has been widely debated due to the relatively weak evidence. In this study, a meta-analysis of prospective and well designed observational studies were performed to explore this association.

METHODS

MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Sciencedirect were searched for studies of vitamin consumption and gastric cancer. This produced 47 relevant studies covering 1,221,392 human subjects. Random effects models were used to estimate summary relative risk (RR). Dose-response, subgroup, sensitivity, meta-regression, and publication bias analyses were conducted.

RESULTS

The RR of gastric cancer in the group with the highest vitamin intake was compared to that of the lowest intake group. Total vitamin intake was 0.78 (95% CI, 0.71-0.83). In 9 studies that individuals were given doses at least 4 times above the tolerable upper intake (UL) vitamins, the RR was 1.20 (95% CI, 0.99-1.44). However, in 17 studies that individuals received doses below the UL, the RR was 0.76 (95% CI, 0.68-0.86). Dose-response analysis was conducted on different increments in different types of vitamins (vitamin A: 1.5 mg/day, vitamin C: 100 mg/day, vitamin E: 10 mg/day) intake with a significant reduction in the risk of gastric cancer, respectively, 29% in vitamin A, 26% in vitamin C, and 24% in vitamin E.

CONCLUSION

This meta-analysis clearly demonstrated that low doses of vitamins can significantly reduce the risk of GC, especially vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E.

Authors+Show Affiliations

State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, China; Department of Gastric and Pancreatic Surgery, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, China.State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, China; Department of Medical Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, China.State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, China; Department of Hematology Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, China.State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, China; Department of Molecular Diagnosis, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, China.Department of Oncological Surgery, the first affiliated hospital of Bengbu medical college, Bengbu, China.State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, China; Department of Gastric and Pancreatic Surgery, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, China.State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, China; Department of Gastric and Pancreatic Surgery, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25549091

Citation

Kong, Pengfei, et al. "Vitamin Intake Reduce the Risk of Gastric Cancer: Meta-analysis and Systematic Review of Randomized and Observational Studies." PloS One, vol. 9, no. 12, 2014, pp. e116060.
Kong P, Cai Q, Geng Q, et al. Vitamin intake reduce the risk of gastric cancer: meta-analysis and systematic review of randomized and observational studies. PLoS ONE. 2014;9(12):e116060.
Kong, P., Cai, Q., Geng, Q., Wang, J., Lan, Y., Zhan, Y., & Xu, D. (2014). Vitamin intake reduce the risk of gastric cancer: meta-analysis and systematic review of randomized and observational studies. PloS One, 9(12), pp. e116060. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0116060.
Kong P, et al. Vitamin Intake Reduce the Risk of Gastric Cancer: Meta-analysis and Systematic Review of Randomized and Observational Studies. PLoS ONE. 2014;9(12):e116060. PubMed PMID: 25549091.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin intake reduce the risk of gastric cancer: meta-analysis and systematic review of randomized and observational studies. AU - Kong,Pengfei, AU - Cai,Qingqing, AU - Geng,Qirong, AU - Wang,Jing, AU - Lan,Yadong, AU - Zhan,Youqing, AU - Xu,Dazhi, Y1 - 2014/12/30/ PY - 2014/08/04/received PY - 2014/12/01/accepted PY - 2014/12/31/entrez PY - 2014/12/31/pubmed PY - 2015/9/15/medline SP - e116060 EP - e116060 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 9 IS - 12 N2 - AIM: The association between vitamin intake and gastric cancer (GC) has been widely debated due to the relatively weak evidence. In this study, a meta-analysis of prospective and well designed observational studies were performed to explore this association. METHODS: MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Sciencedirect were searched for studies of vitamin consumption and gastric cancer. This produced 47 relevant studies covering 1,221,392 human subjects. Random effects models were used to estimate summary relative risk (RR). Dose-response, subgroup, sensitivity, meta-regression, and publication bias analyses were conducted. RESULTS: The RR of gastric cancer in the group with the highest vitamin intake was compared to that of the lowest intake group. Total vitamin intake was 0.78 (95% CI, 0.71-0.83). In 9 studies that individuals were given doses at least 4 times above the tolerable upper intake (UL) vitamins, the RR was 1.20 (95% CI, 0.99-1.44). However, in 17 studies that individuals received doses below the UL, the RR was 0.76 (95% CI, 0.68-0.86). Dose-response analysis was conducted on different increments in different types of vitamins (vitamin A: 1.5 mg/day, vitamin C: 100 mg/day, vitamin E: 10 mg/day) intake with a significant reduction in the risk of gastric cancer, respectively, 29% in vitamin A, 26% in vitamin C, and 24% in vitamin E. CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis clearly demonstrated that low doses of vitamins can significantly reduce the risk of GC, especially vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25549091/full_citation L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0116060 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -