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Probiotics to prevent gastrointestinal toxicity from cancer therapy: an interpretive review and call to action.
Curr Opin Support Palliat Care 2015; 9(2):157-62CO

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW

There is currently an unmet need for agents that can prevent the gastrointestinal toxicity (mucositis and enteritis) associated with chemotherapy and radiation therapy of abdominal and pelvic cancers. Herein we provide an overview of how manipulation of the gut microbiota by probiotic administration affects these gastrointestinal symptoms. We focus this review on published human trials and also provide suggestions on how the field can move forward.

RECENT FINDINGS

Several clinical trials of varying design, patient populations and probiotic products have been reported. Lactobacillus probiotics of adequate dosage demonstrate a potential to reduce gastrointestinal toxicity when administered prophylactically. Common study limitations prevent the widespread adoption of this practice at this point but are informative for rational design of future trials.

SUMMARY

No single probiotic strain or product has emerged from human clinical trials for this indication. Further human studies are required to address limitations in the current literature. Preclinical model data should be used to inform the rational design of these new clinical trials to adequately address this important question.

Authors+Show Affiliations

aDivision of Gastroenterology, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri bDepartment of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota cDepartment of Radiation Oncology, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25872116

Citation

Ciorba, Matthew A., et al. "Probiotics to Prevent Gastrointestinal Toxicity From Cancer Therapy: an Interpretive Review and Call to Action." Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care, vol. 9, no. 2, 2015, pp. 157-62.
Ciorba MA, Hallemeier CL, Stenson WF, et al. Probiotics to prevent gastrointestinal toxicity from cancer therapy: an interpretive review and call to action. Curr Opin Support Palliat Care. 2015;9(2):157-62.
Ciorba, M. A., Hallemeier, C. L., Stenson, W. F., & Parikh, P. J. (2015). Probiotics to prevent gastrointestinal toxicity from cancer therapy: an interpretive review and call to action. Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care, 9(2), pp. 157-62. doi:10.1097/SPC.0000000000000134.
Ciorba MA, et al. Probiotics to Prevent Gastrointestinal Toxicity From Cancer Therapy: an Interpretive Review and Call to Action. Curr Opin Support Palliat Care. 2015;9(2):157-62. PubMed PMID: 25872116.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Probiotics to prevent gastrointestinal toxicity from cancer therapy: an interpretive review and call to action. AU - Ciorba,Matthew A, AU - Hallemeier,Christopher L, AU - Stenson,William F, AU - Parikh,Parag J, PY - 2015/4/15/entrez PY - 2015/4/15/pubmed PY - 2016/1/28/medline SP - 157 EP - 62 JF - Current opinion in supportive and palliative care JO - Curr Opin Support Palliat Care VL - 9 IS - 2 N2 - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: There is currently an unmet need for agents that can prevent the gastrointestinal toxicity (mucositis and enteritis) associated with chemotherapy and radiation therapy of abdominal and pelvic cancers. Herein we provide an overview of how manipulation of the gut microbiota by probiotic administration affects these gastrointestinal symptoms. We focus this review on published human trials and also provide suggestions on how the field can move forward. RECENT FINDINGS: Several clinical trials of varying design, patient populations and probiotic products have been reported. Lactobacillus probiotics of adequate dosage demonstrate a potential to reduce gastrointestinal toxicity when administered prophylactically. Common study limitations prevent the widespread adoption of this practice at this point but are informative for rational design of future trials. SUMMARY: No single probiotic strain or product has emerged from human clinical trials for this indication. Further human studies are required to address limitations in the current literature. Preclinical model data should be used to inform the rational design of these new clinical trials to adequately address this important question. SN - 1751-4266 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25872116/full_citation L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=25872116 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -