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Cervical Cancer Screening in Average-Risk Women: Best Practice Advice From the Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians.
Ann Intern Med 2015; 162(12):851-9AIM

Abstract

DESCRIPTION

The purpose of this best practice advice article is to describe the indications for screening for cervical cancer in asymptomatic, average-risk women aged 21 years or older.

METHODS

The evidence reviewed in this work is a distillation of relevant publications (including systematic reviews) used to support current guidelines.

BEST PRACTICE ADVICE 1

Clinicians should not screen average-risk women younger than 21 years for cervical cancer.

BEST PRACTICE ADVICE 2

Clinicians should start screening average-risk women for cervical cancer at age 21 years once every 3 years with cytology (cytologic tests without human papillomavirus [HPV] tests).

BEST PRACTICE ADVICE 3

Clinicians should not screen average-risk women for cervical cancer with cytology more often than once every 3 years.

BEST PRACTICE ADVICE 4

Clinicians may use a combination of cytology and HPV testing once every 5 years in average-risk women aged 30 years or older who prefer screening less often than every 3 years.

BEST PRACTICE ADVICE 5

Clinicians should not perform HPV testing in average-risk women younger than 30 years.

BEST PRACTICE ADVICE 6

Clinicians should stop screening average-risk women older than 65 years for cervical cancer if they have had 3 consecutive negative cytology results or 2 consecutive negative cytology plus HPV test results within 10 years, with the most recent test performed within 5 years.

BEST PRACTICE ADVICE 7

Clinicians should not screen average-risk women of any age for cervical cancer if they have had a hysterectomy with removal of the cervix.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Practice Guideline
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25928075

Citation

Sawaya, George F., et al. "Cervical Cancer Screening in Average-Risk Women: Best Practice Advice From the Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians." Annals of Internal Medicine, vol. 162, no. 12, 2015, pp. 851-9.
Sawaya GF, Kulasingam S, Denberg TD, et al. Cervical Cancer Screening in Average-Risk Women: Best Practice Advice From the Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians. Ann Intern Med. 2015;162(12):851-9.
Sawaya, G. F., Kulasingam, S., Denberg, T. D., & Qaseem, A. (2015). Cervical Cancer Screening in Average-Risk Women: Best Practice Advice From the Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians. Annals of Internal Medicine, 162(12), pp. 851-9. doi:10.7326/M14-2426.
Sawaya GF, et al. Cervical Cancer Screening in Average-Risk Women: Best Practice Advice From the Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians. Ann Intern Med. 2015 Jun 16;162(12):851-9. PubMed PMID: 25928075.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cervical Cancer Screening in Average-Risk Women: Best Practice Advice From the Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians. AU - Sawaya,George F, AU - Kulasingam,Shalini, AU - Denberg,Thomas D, AU - Qaseem,Amir, AU - ,, PY - 2015/5/1/entrez PY - 2015/5/1/pubmed PY - 2015/8/26/medline SP - 851 EP - 9 JF - Annals of internal medicine JO - Ann. Intern. Med. VL - 162 IS - 12 N2 - DESCRIPTION: The purpose of this best practice advice article is to describe the indications for screening for cervical cancer in asymptomatic, average-risk women aged 21 years or older. METHODS: The evidence reviewed in this work is a distillation of relevant publications (including systematic reviews) used to support current guidelines. BEST PRACTICE ADVICE 1: Clinicians should not screen average-risk women younger than 21 years for cervical cancer. BEST PRACTICE ADVICE 2: Clinicians should start screening average-risk women for cervical cancer at age 21 years once every 3 years with cytology (cytologic tests without human papillomavirus [HPV] tests). BEST PRACTICE ADVICE 3: Clinicians should not screen average-risk women for cervical cancer with cytology more often than once every 3 years. BEST PRACTICE ADVICE 4: Clinicians may use a combination of cytology and HPV testing once every 5 years in average-risk women aged 30 years or older who prefer screening less often than every 3 years. BEST PRACTICE ADVICE 5: Clinicians should not perform HPV testing in average-risk women younger than 30 years. BEST PRACTICE ADVICE 6: Clinicians should stop screening average-risk women older than 65 years for cervical cancer if they have had 3 consecutive negative cytology results or 2 consecutive negative cytology plus HPV test results within 10 years, with the most recent test performed within 5 years. BEST PRACTICE ADVICE 7: Clinicians should not screen average-risk women of any age for cervical cancer if they have had a hysterectomy with removal of the cervix. SN - 1539-3704 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25928075/full_citation L2 - https://www.annals.org/article.aspx?doi=10.7326/M14-2426 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -