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Red meat, processed meat and the risk of venous thromboembolism: friend or foe?

Abstract

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a highly prevalent condition worldwide, which can be triggered by a combination of inherited and acquired risk factors, including diet. Several lines of evidence suggest that consumption of red and processed meat is associated with a significant risk of colorectal cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Therefore, an electronic search was conducted to identify clinical studies investigating the potential association between the risk of venous thrombosis and consumption of red or processed meat. Seven articles were finally included in this review, 6 prospective studies and 1 case-control investigation. Taken together, the evidence of the current scientific literature suggests that whether or not a pathophysiological link may exist between red or processed meat consumption and venous thrombosis, the association is definitely weak, since it was found to be non-statistically significant in four prospective cohort studies, marginally significant in one prospective cohort study and highly significant in the remaining prospective cohort study. In the single case-control study, the risk was also found to be non-statistically significant. Although further studies will be needed to definitely establish the existence of a thrombotic risk associated with different subtypes of red or processed meat, it seems premature to conclude that a reduced consumption of red and processed meat lowers the risk of VTE.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Laboratory of Clinical Chemistry and Hematology, Academic Hospital of Parma, Parma, Italy. Electronic address: glippi@ao.pr.it.

    ,

    Emergency Department, Academic Hospital of Parma, Parma, Italy.

    Service of Clinical Governance, General Hospital of Trento, Trento, Italy.

    Source

    Thrombosis research 136:2 2015 Aug pg 208-11

    MeSH

    Feeding Behavior
    Humans
    Red Meat
    Risk Factors
    Venous Thromboembolism

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    25962721

    Citation

    Lippi, Giuseppe, et al. "Red Meat, Processed Meat and the Risk of Venous Thromboembolism: Friend or Foe?" Thrombosis Research, vol. 136, no. 2, 2015, pp. 208-11.
    Lippi G, Cervellin G, Mattiuzzi C. Red meat, processed meat and the risk of venous thromboembolism: friend or foe? Thromb Res. 2015;136(2):208-11.
    Lippi, G., Cervellin, G., & Mattiuzzi, C. (2015). Red meat, processed meat and the risk of venous thromboembolism: friend or foe? Thrombosis Research, 136(2), pp. 208-11. doi:10.1016/j.thromres.2015.04.027.
    Lippi G, Cervellin G, Mattiuzzi C. Red Meat, Processed Meat and the Risk of Venous Thromboembolism: Friend or Foe. Thromb Res. 2015;136(2):208-11. PubMed PMID: 25962721.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Red meat, processed meat and the risk of venous thromboembolism: friend or foe? AU - Lippi,Giuseppe, AU - Cervellin,Gianfranco, AU - Mattiuzzi,Camilla, Y1 - 2015/04/29/ PY - 2015/02/16/received PY - 2015/04/13/revised PY - 2015/04/22/accepted PY - 2015/5/13/entrez PY - 2015/5/13/pubmed PY - 2016/4/30/medline KW - Deep vein thrombosis KW - Processed meat KW - Pulmonary embolism KW - Red meat KW - Venous thromboembolism SP - 208 EP - 11 JF - Thrombosis research JO - Thromb. Res. VL - 136 IS - 2 N2 - Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a highly prevalent condition worldwide, which can be triggered by a combination of inherited and acquired risk factors, including diet. Several lines of evidence suggest that consumption of red and processed meat is associated with a significant risk of colorectal cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Therefore, an electronic search was conducted to identify clinical studies investigating the potential association between the risk of venous thrombosis and consumption of red or processed meat. Seven articles were finally included in this review, 6 prospective studies and 1 case-control investigation. Taken together, the evidence of the current scientific literature suggests that whether or not a pathophysiological link may exist between red or processed meat consumption and venous thrombosis, the association is definitely weak, since it was found to be non-statistically significant in four prospective cohort studies, marginally significant in one prospective cohort study and highly significant in the remaining prospective cohort study. In the single case-control study, the risk was also found to be non-statistically significant. Although further studies will be needed to definitely establish the existence of a thrombotic risk associated with different subtypes of red or processed meat, it seems premature to conclude that a reduced consumption of red and processed meat lowers the risk of VTE. SN - 1879-2472 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25962721/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0049-3848(15)00199-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -