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Dairy intake after prostate cancer diagnosis in relation to disease-specific and total mortality.
Int J Cancer 2015; 137(10):2462-9IJ

Abstract

Information regarding postdiagnostic dairy intake and prostate cancer survival is limited. We evaluated intake of total, high-fat and low-fat dairy after prostate cancer diagnosis in relation to disease-specific and total mortality. We included 926 men from the Physicians' Health Study diagnosed with non-metastatic prostate cancer between 1982 and 2000 who completed a diet questionnaire a median of 5 years after diagnosis and were followed thereafter for a median of 10 years to assess mortality. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate associations between dairy intake and prostate cancer specific and all-cause mortality. During 8,903 person-years of follow-up, 333 men died, 56 due to prostate cancer. Men consuming ≥3 servings/day of total dairy products had a 76% higher risk of total mortality and a 141% higher risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality compared to men who consumed less than 1 dairy product/day (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.76, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.21, 2.55, ptrend < 0.001 for total mortality; HR = 2.41, 95% CI: 0.96, 6.02, ptrend = 0.04 for prostate cancer-specific mortality). The association between high-fat dairy and mortality risk appeared to be stronger than that of low-fat dairy, but the difference between them was not statistically significant (p for difference = 0.57 for prostate cancer-specific mortality and 0.56 for total mortality). Among men without metastases when diagnosed, higher intake of dairy foods after prostate cancer diagnosis may be associated with increased prostate cancer-specific and all-cause mortality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H.Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H.Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, CA.Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H.Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H.Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H.Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H.Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H.Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H.Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H.Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25989745

Citation

Yang, Meng, et al. "Dairy Intake After Prostate Cancer Diagnosis in Relation to Disease-specific and Total Mortality." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 137, no. 10, 2015, pp. 2462-9.
Yang M, Kenfield SA, Van Blarigan EL, et al. Dairy intake after prostate cancer diagnosis in relation to disease-specific and total mortality. Int J Cancer. 2015;137(10):2462-9.
Yang, M., Kenfield, S. A., Van Blarigan, E. L., Wilson, K. M., Batista, J. L., Sesso, H. D., ... Chavarro, J. E. (2015). Dairy intake after prostate cancer diagnosis in relation to disease-specific and total mortality. International Journal of Cancer, 137(10), pp. 2462-9. doi:10.1002/ijc.29608.
Yang M, et al. Dairy Intake After Prostate Cancer Diagnosis in Relation to Disease-specific and Total Mortality. Int J Cancer. 2015 Nov 15;137(10):2462-9. PubMed PMID: 25989745.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dairy intake after prostate cancer diagnosis in relation to disease-specific and total mortality. AU - Yang,Meng, AU - Kenfield,Stacey A, AU - Van Blarigan,Erin L, AU - Wilson,Kathryn M, AU - Batista,Julie L, AU - Sesso,Howard D, AU - Ma,Jing, AU - Stampfer,Meir J, AU - Chavarro,Jorge E, Y1 - 2015/06/03/ PY - 2015/02/23/received PY - 2015/05/11/accepted PY - 2015/5/21/entrez PY - 2015/5/21/pubmed PY - 2015/12/24/medline KW - Physicians’ Health Study KW - all-cause mortality KW - dairy products KW - prostate cancer SP - 2462 EP - 9 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 137 IS - 10 N2 - Information regarding postdiagnostic dairy intake and prostate cancer survival is limited. We evaluated intake of total, high-fat and low-fat dairy after prostate cancer diagnosis in relation to disease-specific and total mortality. We included 926 men from the Physicians' Health Study diagnosed with non-metastatic prostate cancer between 1982 and 2000 who completed a diet questionnaire a median of 5 years after diagnosis and were followed thereafter for a median of 10 years to assess mortality. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate associations between dairy intake and prostate cancer specific and all-cause mortality. During 8,903 person-years of follow-up, 333 men died, 56 due to prostate cancer. Men consuming ≥3 servings/day of total dairy products had a 76% higher risk of total mortality and a 141% higher risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality compared to men who consumed less than 1 dairy product/day (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.76, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.21, 2.55, ptrend < 0.001 for total mortality; HR = 2.41, 95% CI: 0.96, 6.02, ptrend = 0.04 for prostate cancer-specific mortality). The association between high-fat dairy and mortality risk appeared to be stronger than that of low-fat dairy, but the difference between them was not statistically significant (p for difference = 0.57 for prostate cancer-specific mortality and 0.56 for total mortality). Among men without metastases when diagnosed, higher intake of dairy foods after prostate cancer diagnosis may be associated with increased prostate cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. SN - 1097-0215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25989745/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.29608 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -