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Vitamin D therapy in inflammatory bowel diseases: who, in what form, and how much?
J Crohns Colitis 2015; 9(2):198-209JC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The north–south geographical gradient of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) prevalence, its epidemiology, the genetic association of vitamin D receptor polymorphisms, and results in animal models suggest that vitamin D plays an important role in the pathogenesis of IBD.

AIMS

The purpose of this review was to critically appraise the effectiveness and safety of vitamin D therapy in patients with IBD.

METHODS

MEDLINE, Scopus and Google Scholar were searched from inception to May 20, 2014 using the terms ‘Crohn’s disease’, ‘ulcerative colitis’ and ‘vitamin D’. Results: Vitamin D deficiency is common in patients with IBD. Limited clinical data suggest an association between low vitamin D concentration and increased disease activity in both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD). To date, only two small open label trials and one randomized controlled trial have shown a positive effect of vitamin D supplementation on disease activity in patients with CD; no effect has been shown for UC. An optimal vitamin D supplementation protocol for patients with IBD remains undetermined, but targeting serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] levels between 30 and 50 ng/mL appears safe and may have benefits for IBD disease activity. Depending on baseline vitamin D serum concentration, ileal involvement in CD, body mass index, and perhaps smoking status, daily vitamin D doses between 1800–10,000 international units/day are probably necessary.

CONCLUSION

Increasing preclinical and clinical evidence suggests a role for vitamin D deficiency in the development and severity of IBD. The possible therapeutic role of vitamin D in patients with IBD merits continued investigation.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26046136

Citation

Hlavaty, Tibor, et al. "Vitamin D Therapy in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Who, in what Form, and How Much?" Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, vol. 9, no. 2, 2015, pp. 198-209.
Hlavaty T, Krajcovicova A, Payer J. Vitamin D therapy in inflammatory bowel diseases: who, in what form, and how much? J Crohns Colitis. 2015;9(2):198-209.
Hlavaty, T., Krajcovicova, A., & Payer, J. (2015). Vitamin D therapy in inflammatory bowel diseases: who, in what form, and how much? Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, 9(2), pp. 198-209.
Hlavaty T, Krajcovicova A, Payer J. Vitamin D Therapy in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Who, in what Form, and How Much. J Crohns Colitis. 2015;9(2):198-209. PubMed PMID: 26046136.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin D therapy in inflammatory bowel diseases: who, in what form, and how much? AU - Hlavaty,Tibor, AU - Krajcovicova,Anna, AU - Payer,Juraj, PY - 2015/6/6/entrez PY - 2015/6/6/pubmed PY - 2016/1/8/medline SP - 198 EP - 209 JF - Journal of Crohn's & colitis JO - J Crohns Colitis VL - 9 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: The north–south geographical gradient of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) prevalence, its epidemiology, the genetic association of vitamin D receptor polymorphisms, and results in animal models suggest that vitamin D plays an important role in the pathogenesis of IBD. AIMS: The purpose of this review was to critically appraise the effectiveness and safety of vitamin D therapy in patients with IBD. METHODS: MEDLINE, Scopus and Google Scholar were searched from inception to May 20, 2014 using the terms ‘Crohn’s disease’, ‘ulcerative colitis’ and ‘vitamin D’. Results: Vitamin D deficiency is common in patients with IBD. Limited clinical data suggest an association between low vitamin D concentration and increased disease activity in both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD). To date, only two small open label trials and one randomized controlled trial have shown a positive effect of vitamin D supplementation on disease activity in patients with CD; no effect has been shown for UC. An optimal vitamin D supplementation protocol for patients with IBD remains undetermined, but targeting serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] levels between 30 and 50 ng/mL appears safe and may have benefits for IBD disease activity. Depending on baseline vitamin D serum concentration, ileal involvement in CD, body mass index, and perhaps smoking status, daily vitamin D doses between 1800–10,000 international units/day are probably necessary. CONCLUSION: Increasing preclinical and clinical evidence suggests a role for vitamin D deficiency in the development and severity of IBD. The possible therapeutic role of vitamin D in patients with IBD merits continued investigation. SN - 1876-4479 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26046136/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ecco-jcc/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ecco-jcc/jju004 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -