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Saturated, Monounsaturated and Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Intake and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: Evidence from Observational Studies.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although the relationship between dietary monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), and saturated fatty acids (SFAs) intake and pancreatic cancer risk has been reported by several studies, the evidence is controversial. We firstly conducted this comprehensive meta-analysis to summarize the aforementioned evidence from observational studies.

METHODS

The MEDLINE (PubMed), Embase, and ISI Web of Science databases were used to search for epidemiological studies of dietary SFA, MUFA, and PUFA and pancreatic cancer risk that were published until the end of June 2014. Random- or fixed-effects models were used to estimate the relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We also carried out subgroup, sensitivity, and publication bias analyses.

RESULTS

We identified 13 case-control studies and 7 prospective studies which including 6270 pancreatic cancer cases in the meta-analysis of SFA, MUFA, and PUFA and risk of pancreatic cancer. The summary RR was 1.13 (95%CI = 0.94-1.35, I2 = 70.7%) for SFA, 1.00 (95%CI = 0.87-1.14, I2 = 43.4%) for MUFA, and 0.87 (95%CI = 0.75-1.00, I2 = 55.3%) for PUFA for high versus low intake categories. We found no evidence of publication bias.

CONCLUSION

In summary, findings of this study supports an inverse association between diets high in PUFA and pancreatic cancer risk. Further large prospective studies are warranted to report the results stratified by the subtypes of MUFA and PUFA and adjust for other potential risk factors to eliminate residual confounding.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of General Surgery, Shengjing Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, P. R. China.

    Department of General Surgery, Shengjing Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, P. R. China.

    Source

    PloS one 10:6 2015 pg e0130870

    MeSH

    Diet
    Dietary Fats
    Fatty Acids
    Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated
    Fatty Acids, Unsaturated
    Humans
    Pancreatic Neoplasms
    Risk

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Meta-Analysis

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    26110621

    Citation

    Yao, Xu, and Zhong Tian. "Saturated, Monounsaturated and Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Intake and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: Evidence From Observational Studies." PloS One, vol. 10, no. 6, 2015, pp. e0130870.
    Yao X, Tian Z. Saturated, Monounsaturated and Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Intake and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: Evidence from Observational Studies. PLoS ONE. 2015;10(6):e0130870.
    Yao, X., & Tian, Z. (2015). Saturated, Monounsaturated and Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Intake and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: Evidence from Observational Studies. PloS One, 10(6), pp. e0130870. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0130870.
    Yao X, Tian Z. Saturated, Monounsaturated and Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Intake and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: Evidence From Observational Studies. PLoS ONE. 2015;10(6):e0130870. PubMed PMID: 26110621.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Saturated, Monounsaturated and Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Intake and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: Evidence from Observational Studies. AU - Yao,Xu, AU - Tian,Zhong, Y1 - 2015/06/25/ PY - 2014/12/07/received PY - 2015/05/26/accepted PY - 2015/6/26/entrez PY - 2015/6/26/pubmed PY - 2016/4/7/medline SP - e0130870 EP - e0130870 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 10 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although the relationship between dietary monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), and saturated fatty acids (SFAs) intake and pancreatic cancer risk has been reported by several studies, the evidence is controversial. We firstly conducted this comprehensive meta-analysis to summarize the aforementioned evidence from observational studies. METHODS: The MEDLINE (PubMed), Embase, and ISI Web of Science databases were used to search for epidemiological studies of dietary SFA, MUFA, and PUFA and pancreatic cancer risk that were published until the end of June 2014. Random- or fixed-effects models were used to estimate the relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We also carried out subgroup, sensitivity, and publication bias analyses. RESULTS: We identified 13 case-control studies and 7 prospective studies which including 6270 pancreatic cancer cases in the meta-analysis of SFA, MUFA, and PUFA and risk of pancreatic cancer. The summary RR was 1.13 (95%CI = 0.94-1.35, I2 = 70.7%) for SFA, 1.00 (95%CI = 0.87-1.14, I2 = 43.4%) for MUFA, and 0.87 (95%CI = 0.75-1.00, I2 = 55.3%) for PUFA for high versus low intake categories. We found no evidence of publication bias. CONCLUSION: In summary, findings of this study supports an inverse association between diets high in PUFA and pancreatic cancer risk. Further large prospective studies are warranted to report the results stratified by the subtypes of MUFA and PUFA and adjust for other potential risk factors to eliminate residual confounding. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26110621/full_citation L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0130870 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -