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Moderate Alcohol Consumption and Colorectal Cancer Risk.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2015; 39(8):1280-91AC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Heavy alcohol drinking is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC); previous studies have shown a linear dose-dependent association between alcohol intake and CRC. However, some studies suggest that moderate alcohol consumption may have a protective effect, similar to that seen in cardiovascular disease. Other factors may interact with alcohol and contribute additional risk for CRC. We aimed to determine the association between moderate alcohol consumption, limited to 30 g of alcohol per day, by beverage type on CRC risk and to assess the effects of other factors that interact with alcohol to influence CRC risk.

METHODS

The PubMed database was used to find articles published between 2008 and 2014 related to alcohol and CRC. Twenty-one relevant articles were evaluated and summarized, including 11 articles reporting on CRC risk associated with moderate intake and 10 articles focusing on genetic interactions associated with alcohol and CRC risk.

RESULTS

The association between alcohol and increased risk for CRC was found when intakes exceeded 30 g/d alcohol. Nonsignificant results were consistently reported for intakes <30 g/d. Additional risks for CRC were found to be related to obesity and folate status for regular alcohol consumers. Some significant results suggest that the development of CRC is dependent on the interaction of gene and environment.

CONCLUSIONS

The association between the amount of alcohol consumed and the incidence of CRC was not significant at moderate intake levels. Moderate alcohol consumption was associated with a reduced CRC risk in study populations with greater adherence to a Mediterranean diet, where wine contributed substantially to the alcoholic beverage consumed. Other factors such as obesity, folate deficiency, and genetic susceptibility may contribute additional CRC risk for those consuming alcohol. To minimize CRC risk, appropriate recommendations should encourage intakes below 30 g of alcohol each day.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences, San Diego State University, San Diego, California.Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, San Diego, California.Department of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences, San Diego State University, San Diego, California.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26110674

Citation

Klarich, DawnKylee S., et al. "Moderate Alcohol Consumption and Colorectal Cancer Risk." Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 39, no. 8, 2015, pp. 1280-91.
Klarich DS, Brasser SM, Hong MY. Moderate Alcohol Consumption and Colorectal Cancer Risk. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2015;39(8):1280-91.
Klarich, D. S., Brasser, S. M., & Hong, M. Y. (2015). Moderate Alcohol Consumption and Colorectal Cancer Risk. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, 39(8), pp. 1280-91. doi:10.1111/acer.12778.
Klarich DS, Brasser SM, Hong MY. Moderate Alcohol Consumption and Colorectal Cancer Risk. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2015;39(8):1280-91. PubMed PMID: 26110674.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Moderate Alcohol Consumption and Colorectal Cancer Risk. AU - Klarich,DawnKylee S, AU - Brasser,Susan M, AU - Hong,Mee Young, Y1 - 2015/06/25/ PY - 2015/03/02/received PY - 2015/05/11/accepted PY - 2015/6/26/entrez PY - 2015/6/26/pubmed PY - 2016/5/3/medline KW - Alcohol KW - Colorectal Cancer KW - Genetic KW - Moderate SP - 1280 EP - 91 JF - Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research JO - Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res. VL - 39 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Heavy alcohol drinking is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC); previous studies have shown a linear dose-dependent association between alcohol intake and CRC. However, some studies suggest that moderate alcohol consumption may have a protective effect, similar to that seen in cardiovascular disease. Other factors may interact with alcohol and contribute additional risk for CRC. We aimed to determine the association between moderate alcohol consumption, limited to 30 g of alcohol per day, by beverage type on CRC risk and to assess the effects of other factors that interact with alcohol to influence CRC risk. METHODS: The PubMed database was used to find articles published between 2008 and 2014 related to alcohol and CRC. Twenty-one relevant articles were evaluated and summarized, including 11 articles reporting on CRC risk associated with moderate intake and 10 articles focusing on genetic interactions associated with alcohol and CRC risk. RESULTS: The association between alcohol and increased risk for CRC was found when intakes exceeded 30 g/d alcohol. Nonsignificant results were consistently reported for intakes <30 g/d. Additional risks for CRC were found to be related to obesity and folate status for regular alcohol consumers. Some significant results suggest that the development of CRC is dependent on the interaction of gene and environment. CONCLUSIONS: The association between the amount of alcohol consumed and the incidence of CRC was not significant at moderate intake levels. Moderate alcohol consumption was associated with a reduced CRC risk in study populations with greater adherence to a Mediterranean diet, where wine contributed substantially to the alcoholic beverage consumed. Other factors such as obesity, folate deficiency, and genetic susceptibility may contribute additional CRC risk for those consuming alcohol. To minimize CRC risk, appropriate recommendations should encourage intakes below 30 g of alcohol each day. SN - 1530-0277 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26110674/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/acer.12778 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -