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Calcium revisited, part III: effect of dietary calcium on BMD and fracture risk.

Abstract

Food can be an excellent source of calcium. Dietary calcium is in general as well absorbed as calcium supplements, and exerts the same effects on bone. The main sources are dairy products, but also some vegetables and fruits contain considerable amounts of calcium. Mineral water can serve as a supplement. Cross-sectional, longitudinal and some interventional trials have shown positive effects on bone metabolism, bone density and bone loss. But the effect on fracture incidence is less certain, and that of milk, the most studied dairy product, still unproven.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    Osteoporosis Clinic, Hirslanden Clinic/Bois Cerf , Lausanne, Switzerland.

    Source

    BoneKEy reports 4: 2015 pg 708

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    26331006

    Citation

    Burckhardt, Peter. "Calcium Revisited, Part III: Effect of Dietary Calcium On BMD and Fracture Risk." BoneKEy Reports, vol. 4, 2015, p. 708.
    Burckhardt P. Calcium revisited, part III: effect of dietary calcium on BMD and fracture risk. Bonekey Rep. 2015;4:708.
    Burckhardt, P. (2015). Calcium revisited, part III: effect of dietary calcium on BMD and fracture risk. BoneKEy Reports, 4, p. 708. doi:10.1038/bonekey.2015.77.
    Burckhardt P. Calcium Revisited, Part III: Effect of Dietary Calcium On BMD and Fracture Risk. Bonekey Rep. 2015;4:708. PubMed PMID: 26331006.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Calcium revisited, part III: effect of dietary calcium on BMD and fracture risk. A1 - Burckhardt,Peter, Y1 - 2015/08/05/ PY - 2014/09/15/received PY - 2015/02/16/accepted PY - 2015/9/3/entrez PY - 2015/9/4/pubmed PY - 2015/9/4/medline SP - 708 EP - 708 JF - BoneKEy reports JO - Bonekey Rep VL - 4 N2 - Food can be an excellent source of calcium. Dietary calcium is in general as well absorbed as calcium supplements, and exerts the same effects on bone. The main sources are dairy products, but also some vegetables and fruits contain considerable amounts of calcium. Mineral water can serve as a supplement. Cross-sectional, longitudinal and some interventional trials have shown positive effects on bone metabolism, bone density and bone loss. But the effect on fracture incidence is less certain, and that of milk, the most studied dairy product, still unproven. SN - 2047-6396 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26331006/full_citation L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/bonekey.2015.77 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -