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Levels of Red Blood Cell Fatty Acids in Patients With Psychosis, Their Unaffected Siblings, and Healthy Controls.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Two recent meta-analyses showed decreased red blood cell (RBC) polyunsaturated fatty acids (FA) in schizophrenia and related disorders. However, both these meta-analyses report considerable heterogeneity, probably related to differences in patient samples between studies. Here, we investigated whether variations in RBC FA are associated with psychosis, and thus may be an intermediate phenotype of the disorder.

METHODS

For the present study, a total of 215 patients (87% outpatients), 187 siblings, and 98 controls were investigated for multiple FA analyses. Based on previous studies, we investigated docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA), arachidonic acid (AA), linoleic acid (LA), nervonic acid (NA), and eicasopentaenoic acid (EPA). On an exploratory basis, a large number of additional FA were investigated. Multilevel mixed models were used to compare the FA between the 3 groups.

RESULTS

Compared to controls, both patients and siblings showed significantly increased DHA, DPA, AA, and NA. LA was significantly higher in siblings compared to controls. EPA was not significantly different between the 3 groups. Also the exploratory FA were increased in patients and siblings.

CONCLUSIONS

We found increased RBC FA DHA, DPA, AA, and NA in patients and siblings compared to controls. The direction of change is similar in both patients and siblings, which may suggest a shared environment and/or an intermediate phenotype. Differences between patient samples reflecting stage of disorder, dietary patterns, medication use, and drug abuse are possible modifiers of FA, contributing to the heterogeneity in findings concerning FA in schizophrenia patients.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Psychiatry, Antes Center for Mental Health Care, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Psychiatry, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands;

    ,

    Department of Psychiatry, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands;

    ,

    Department of Psychiatry, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands;

    ,

    Laboratory of Genetic and Metabolic Diseases, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands;

    ,

    Department of Psychiatry, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands;

    ,

    Department of Psychiatry, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands;

    ,

    Department of Psychiatry, Antes Center for Mental Health Care, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Psychiatry, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Neuroscience, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; nico.van.beveren@deltapsy.nl.

    , ,

    Department of Psychiatry, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience, The Netherlands;

    ,

    Department of Psychiatry, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands;

    ,

    Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Maastricht University Medical Center, The Netherlands;

    ,

    Department of Psychiatry, University Medical Center Groningen, The Netherlands.

    ,

    Department of Psychiatry, University Medical Center Groningen, The Netherlands.

    ,

    Department of Psychiatry, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience, The Netherlands;

    ,

    Department of Psychiatry, Antes Center for Mental Health Care, Rotterdam, The Netherlands;

    Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Maastricht University Medical Center, The Netherlands;

    Source

    Schizophrenia bulletin 42:2 2016 Mar pg 358-68

    MeSH

    Adult
    Arachidonic Acid
    Docosahexaenoic Acids
    Eicosapentaenoic Acid
    Erythrocytes
    Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated
    Fatty Acids, Unsaturated
    Female
    Healthy Volunteers
    Humans
    Linoleic Acid
    Male
    Psychotic Disorders
    Schizophrenia
    Siblings
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    26385764

    Citation

    Medema, Suzanne, et al. "Levels of Red Blood Cell Fatty Acids in Patients With Psychosis, Their Unaffected Siblings, and Healthy Controls." Schizophrenia Bulletin, vol. 42, no. 2, 2016, pp. 358-68.
    Medema S, Mocking RJ, Koeter MW, et al. Levels of Red Blood Cell Fatty Acids in Patients With Psychosis, Their Unaffected Siblings, and Healthy Controls. Schizophr Bull. 2016;42(2):358-68.
    Medema, S., Mocking, R. J., Koeter, M. W., Vaz, F. M., Meijer, C., de Haan, L., ... Myin-Germeys, I. (2016). Levels of Red Blood Cell Fatty Acids in Patients With Psychosis, Their Unaffected Siblings, and Healthy Controls. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 42(2), pp. 358-68. doi:10.1093/schbul/sbv133.
    Medema S, et al. Levels of Red Blood Cell Fatty Acids in Patients With Psychosis, Their Unaffected Siblings, and Healthy Controls. Schizophr Bull. 2016;42(2):358-68. PubMed PMID: 26385764.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Levels of Red Blood Cell Fatty Acids in Patients With Psychosis, Their Unaffected Siblings, and Healthy Controls. AU - Medema,Suzanne, AU - Mocking,Roel J T, AU - Koeter,Maarten W J, AU - Vaz,Frédéric M, AU - Meijer,Carin, AU - de Haan,Lieuwe, AU - van Beveren,Nico J M, AU - ,, AU - Kahn,René, AU - de Haan,Lieuwe, AU - van Os,Jim, AU - Wiersma,Durk, AU - Bruggeman,Richard, AU - Cahn,Wiepke, AU - Meijer,Carin, AU - Myin-Germeys,Inez, Y1 - 2015/09/18/ PY - 2017/03/01/pmc-release PY - 2015/9/20/entrez PY - 2015/9/20/pubmed PY - 2017/1/4/medline KW - AA (arachidonic acid) KW - FA (fatty acid) KW - NA (nervonic acid) KW - Schizophrenia KW - endophenotype KW - familial SP - 358 EP - 68 JF - Schizophrenia bulletin JO - Schizophr Bull VL - 42 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Two recent meta-analyses showed decreased red blood cell (RBC) polyunsaturated fatty acids (FA) in schizophrenia and related disorders. However, both these meta-analyses report considerable heterogeneity, probably related to differences in patient samples between studies. Here, we investigated whether variations in RBC FA are associated with psychosis, and thus may be an intermediate phenotype of the disorder. METHODS: For the present study, a total of 215 patients (87% outpatients), 187 siblings, and 98 controls were investigated for multiple FA analyses. Based on previous studies, we investigated docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA), arachidonic acid (AA), linoleic acid (LA), nervonic acid (NA), and eicasopentaenoic acid (EPA). On an exploratory basis, a large number of additional FA were investigated. Multilevel mixed models were used to compare the FA between the 3 groups. RESULTS: Compared to controls, both patients and siblings showed significantly increased DHA, DPA, AA, and NA. LA was significantly higher in siblings compared to controls. EPA was not significantly different between the 3 groups. Also the exploratory FA were increased in patients and siblings. CONCLUSIONS: We found increased RBC FA DHA, DPA, AA, and NA in patients and siblings compared to controls. The direction of change is similar in both patients and siblings, which may suggest a shared environment and/or an intermediate phenotype. Differences between patient samples reflecting stage of disorder, dietary patterns, medication use, and drug abuse are possible modifiers of FA, contributing to the heterogeneity in findings concerning FA in schizophrenia patients. SN - 1745-1701 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26385764/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/schizophreniabulletin/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/schbul/sbv133 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -