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Elderly men with moderate and intense training lifestyle present sustained higher antibody responses to influenza vaccine.

Abstract

We aimed to verify whether different levels of training performed regularly and voluntarily for many years could have an impact on one of the main issues of immunosenescence: the poor response to vaccines. We recruited 61 healthy elderly men (65-85 years old), 23 with a moderate training (MT) lifestyle (for 17.0 ± 3.2 years), 22 with an intense training (IT) lifestyle (for 25.9 ± 3.4 years), and 16 without a training lifestyle (NT). Fitness was evaluated through the IPAQ and VO2max consumption. The participants were evaluated regarding cognitive aspects, nutritional status, depression, and quality of life. Antibody titers were determined by hemagglutination inhibition assay prior to influenza vaccination and at 6 weeks and 6 months post-vaccination. Strains used were B, H3N2, and H1N1. Our groups were matched for most characteristics, except for those directly influenced by their lifestyles, such as BMI, VO2max, and MET. In general, MT and IT elderly men showed significantly higher antibody titers to the three vaccine strains post-vaccination than NT elderly men. There were also higher titers against B and H1N1 strains in the trained groups before vaccination. Additionally, there were higher proportions of seroprotected (titers ≥1:40) individuals in the pooled trained groups both at 6 weeks (B and H3N2, p < 0.05) and 6 months (H1N1, p < 0.05; B, p = 0.07). There were no significant differences between the MT and IT groups. Either a moderate or an intense training is associated with stronger and longstanding antibody responses to the influenza vaccine, resulting in higher percentages of seroprotected individuals.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Laboratory of Dermatology and Immunodeficiencies, Dermatology Division, Clinics Hospital, R. Dr. Eneas de Carvalho Aguiar, 470, Cerqueira Cesar, São Paulo, 05403-903, São Paulo, Brazil.

    ,

    Laboratory of Dermatology and Immunodeficiencies, Dermatology Division, Clinics Hospital, R. Dr. Eneas de Carvalho Aguiar, 470, Cerqueira Cesar, São Paulo, 05403-903, São Paulo, Brazil.

    ,

    Laboratory of Dermatology and Immunodeficiencies, Dermatology Division, Clinics Hospital, R. Dr. Eneas de Carvalho Aguiar, 470, Cerqueira Cesar, São Paulo, 05403-903, São Paulo, Brazil.

    ,

    Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, School of Medicine, USP-São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

    ,

    Virology Laboratory, Institute of Tropical Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

    ,

    Virology Laboratory, Institute of Tropical Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

    ,

    Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, School of Medicine, USP-São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

    Laboratory of Dermatology and Immunodeficiencies, Dermatology Division, Clinics Hospital, R. Dr. Eneas de Carvalho Aguiar, 470, Cerqueira Cesar, São Paulo, 05403-903, São Paulo, Brazil. mahong@usp.br. Medical Mycology Laboratory, Institute of Tropical Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. mahong@usp.br.

    Source

    Age (Dordrecht, Netherlands) 37:6 2015 Dec pg 105

    MeSH

    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Aging
    Antibodies, Viral
    Antibody Formation
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Exercise
    Hemagglutination Inhibition Tests
    Humans
    Influenza Vaccines
    Influenza, Human
    Life Style
    Male

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    26480853

    Citation

    TY - JOUR T1 - Elderly men with moderate and intense training lifestyle present sustained higher antibody responses to influenza vaccine. AU - de Araújo,Adriana Ladeira, AU - Silva,Léia Cristina Rodrigues, AU - Fernandes,Juliana Ruiz, AU - Matias,Manuella de Sousa Toledo, AU - Boas,Lucy Santos, AU - Machado,Clarisse Martins, AU - Garcez-Leme,Luiz Eugênio, AU - Benard,Gil, Y1 - 2015/10/19/ PY - 2015/6/16/received PY - 2015/10/7/accepted PY - 2015/10/19/aheadofprint PY - 2015/10/21/entrez PY - 2015/10/21/pubmed PY - 2016/8/9/medline KW - Antibody response KW - Exercise KW - Influenza KW - Lifestyle KW - Vaccine SP - 105 EP - 105 JF - Age (Dordrecht, Netherlands) JO - Age (Dordr) VL - 37 IS - 6 N2 - We aimed to verify whether different levels of training performed regularly and voluntarily for many years could have an impact on one of the main issues of immunosenescence: the poor response to vaccines. We recruited 61 healthy elderly men (65-85 years old), 23 with a moderate training (MT) lifestyle (for 17.0 ± 3.2 years), 22 with an intense training (IT) lifestyle (for 25.9 ± 3.4 years), and 16 without a training lifestyle (NT). Fitness was evaluated through the IPAQ and VO2max consumption. The participants were evaluated regarding cognitive aspects, nutritional status, depression, and quality of life. Antibody titers were determined by hemagglutination inhibition assay prior to influenza vaccination and at 6 weeks and 6 months post-vaccination. Strains used were B, H3N2, and H1N1. Our groups were matched for most characteristics, except for those directly influenced by their lifestyles, such as BMI, VO2max, and MET. In general, MT and IT elderly men showed significantly higher antibody titers to the three vaccine strains post-vaccination than NT elderly men. There were also higher titers against B and H1N1 strains in the trained groups before vaccination. Additionally, there were higher proportions of seroprotected (titers ≥1:40) individuals in the pooled trained groups both at 6 weeks (B and H3N2, p < 0.05) and 6 months (H1N1, p < 0.05; B, p = 0.07). There were no significant differences between the MT and IT groups. Either a moderate or an intense training is associated with stronger and longstanding antibody responses to the influenza vaccine, resulting in higher percentages of seroprotected individuals. SN - 1574-4647 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26480853/full_citation L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11357-015-9843-4 ER -